Loading…
This event has ended. View the official site or create your own event → Check it out
This event has ended. Create your own
Representatives from CNI member organizations gather twice annually to explore new technologies, content, and applications; to further collaboration; to analyze technology policy issues; and to catalyze the development and deployment of new projects. Each member organization may send two representatives. Visit https://www.cni.org/mm/fall-2016 for more information.
View analytic

Sign up or log in to bookmark your favorites and sync them to your phone or calendar.

Monday, December 12
 

8:30am

Executive Roundtable (by prior registration only)
Monday December 12, 2016 8:30am - 11:00am
Ohio Room Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

11:30am

Orientation for First-Time Attendees
Optional orientation session for new attendees, both representatives of new member organizations and new representatives or alternate delegates from existing member organizations; guests and presenters are also welcome.

Speakers
avatar for Clifford Lynch

Clifford Lynch

Executive Director, Coalition for Networked Information
Clifford Lynch has led the Coalition for Networked Information (CNI) since 1997. Prior to joining CNI, Lynch spent 18 years at the University of California Office of the President, the last 10 as Director of Library Automation. Lynch, who holds a Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of California, Berkeley, is an adjunct professor at Berkeley’s School of Information. He is both a past president and recipient of the Award of Merit... Read More →


Monday December 12, 2016 11:30am - 12:15pm
Senate Room Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

12:15pm

Break
Monday December 12, 2016 12:15pm - 1:15pm
Foyer I Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

1:15pm

Opening Plenary: 2016 in Review and 2017 in Prospect
2016 in Review and 2017 in Prospect

This plenary presentation will look at key developments that the Coalition for Networked Information (CNI) has been tracking over the past year, highlight some specific emerging developments that we believe to be of particular importance, and summarize CNI’s 2016-­2017 Program Plan.

https://www.cni.org/program/

Speakers
avatar for Clifford Lynch

Clifford Lynch

Executive Director, Coalition for Networked Information
Clifford Lynch has led the Coalition for Networked Information (CNI) since 1997. Prior to joining CNI, Lynch spent 18 years at the University of California Office of the President, the last 10 as Director of Library Automation. Lynch, who holds a Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of California, Berkeley, is an adjunct professor at Berkeley’s School of Information. He is both a past president and recipient of the Award of Merit... Read More →


Monday December 12, 2016 1:15pm - 2:15pm
Presidential Ballroom Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

2:15pm

Break
Monday December 12, 2016 2:15pm - 2:30pm
Foyer I Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

2:30pm

Building Tools and Services to Support Research Software Preservation and Sharing
Software produced as part of the academic research process is an important part of the scholarly record since it is a manifestation of the creative process that enables discovery. Therefore, ensuring that its intrinsic scholarship value is not lost is of great importance. The last five years have seen a significant increase in activity by university libraries and community-driven organizations towards supporting the preservation of the scholarship value of research data. However, the same cannot be said for the software created or used to work with that data. From the lens of reproducible research and open science, this project briefing highlights challenges and current work at each speaker's organization around providing services and tools to support the preservation and sharing of research software. The Center for Open Science (COS) is developing the free, open source Open Science Framework (OSF) that focuses on managing, curating, sharing, and preserving research workflow. The research lifecycle often includes software at various stages. By taking an approach centered on integration with other services, software preservation and sharing can be added to a researcher's workflow rather than being appended to it thus increasing preservation efficacy.

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology Libraries is investigating lifecycle models for software curation and is conducting an environmental scan of software repositories, and of journal and funder policies. The University of Notre Dame is investigating research software environment capture and reproducibility through the DASPOS (Data and Software Preservation for Open Science) project, and has partnered with the COS to better unify the research lifecycle through implementation of OSF for Institutions (OSFI) integrated with university resources such as high performance computing and repository services. Through OSFI, Notre Dame and Johns Hopkins University (JHU) have also partnered to develop research data archiving tools for the OSF and Fedora repository. Finally, the Data Management Services group at JHU is addressing an institutional gap in consulting and archiving service provision for supporting reproducible and reusable computational research as well as supporting current and future data/software sharing requirements from funders and publishers.

http://osf.io

Speakers
MA

Micah Altman

Director of Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
avatar for Rick Johnson

Rick Johnson

Co-Program Director, Digital Initiatives and Scholarship, University of Notre Dame/Association of Research Libraries
FR

Fernando Rios

CLIR Research Data Management Fellow, Johns Hopkins University
avatar for Jeffrey Spies

Jeffrey Spies

Co-Founder, CTO, Center for Open Science
Jeffrey Spies is the co-founder and Chief Technology Officer of the Center for Open Science (COS; http://cos.io), a non-profit technology company missioned to increase openness, integrity, and reproducibility of scientific research. Jeff is also the co-lead of SHARE (http://share-research.org)--an initiative by the Association of Research Libraries, the Association of American Universities, the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities... Read More →


Monday December 12, 2016 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Pan American Room Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

2:30pm

Capstones: Internet Identity Begins to Fill the Gaps
There has been notable progress in the landscape of Internet identity in the last year as gaps that have impeded deployment at scale begin to fill in. Technology advances in integrating protocol approaches, addressing attribute release and informed consent, and scaling to the exponential growth in metadata are all critical to moving Internet identity from immaturity into infrastructure. Policy developments such as General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and the new National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) 800-63 are providing requirements and clarity that mark a better understanding of what needs to be governed and how. Even business models are taking shape, as users and companies begin to understand the economics of security and privacy. This session will cover these and related developments and what the whole cloth may look like.

Speakers
KK

Ken Klingenstein

Identity Evangelist, Internet2


Monday December 12, 2016 2:30pm - 3:30pm
South American B Room Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

2:30pm

From Archives to Data: Crowdsourcing Special Collections
Crowdsourcing: What's Next (Azzarito)

In the last 10 years, there has been an explosion of crowdsource-based digital humanities projects. Not only have crowdsourced projects increased institutional engagement, but they have also proven to be an effective way to chip away at institutional transcription backlog. However, too often the crowdsourced project ends up being the final digital treatment of these artifacts.

In July 2016, the Library at the University of California Davis launched a crowdsource wine label transcription project as the first step in creating and then leveraging ontologies, data and additional digital assets to create a larger digital platform through which wine-lovers, researchers and historians around the world can understand the stories of wine. The transcription tool allowed the Library to foster engagement and interest in collection, and also provided the foundation on which to build a larger discovery platform. This presentation will discuss how to successfully design a crowdsourcing project that enables the institution to pivot to a larger platform, ways to foster community engagement, and how to organize and use the data generated in a crowdsourcing project.


Crowdsourcing Theater History Metadata from the Archives (Leonard, King)

This presentation will introduce Ensemble@Yale, a crowdsourced transcription project that aims to produce a database of information about theater history at Yale. Ensemble@Yale showcases thousands of pages digitized from archival holdings: nine decades of programs that chronicle the origins of Yale's Department of Drama in 1925, its growth into the influential School of Drama in 1955, and the emergence of its associated professional theater company Yale Repertory Theatre from 1966 through the present day. Through further development of Scribe, a New York Public Library Labs/Zooniverse project funded by an National Endowment for the Humanities Office of Digital Humanities (DH) Implementation Phase DH Grant, Ensemble@Yale harnesses the energy and knowledge of alumni, current Yale College students and the general public to create human interpretations of the wealth of relationships latent in theatrical programs, such as actor/character, playwright/play. In addition to creating a searchable database of answers to reference questions such as "How many Shakespeare plays have been staged at the School of Drama?", "Which plays did Meryl Streep appear in while she was a student?" and "Which actors have played Hamlet at Yale?", Ensemble@Yale is ready to play its part alongside other performance archives in producing a digital network of theater history.

https://labelthis.lib.ucdavis.edu/
http://web.library.yale.edu/dhlab/ensemble

Speakers
AA

Amy Azzarito

Assistant Director, Online Strategy, Library, University of California, Davis
avatar for Lindsay King

Lindsay King

Associate Director, Arts Library, Yale University
Lindsay King is the Assistant Director for Access and Research Services in the Robert B. Haas Family Arts Library at Yale University. She is responsible for collection development, reference, instruction, and outreach supporting students and faculty in studio art, history of art, architecture, drama, theater studies and dance. Lindsay holds an MS in Library and Information Science from the University of Illinois and an MA in Modern Art History... Read More →
avatar for Peter Leonard

Peter Leonard

Director, DHLab, Yale University
Peter Leonard is the Director of the Digital Humanities Lab at Yale University Library, which helps scholars answer humanistic questions with quantitative and algorithmic methods. He previously served as a post-doctoral researcher at UCLA on a Google Digital Humanities Grant to text-mine literature in the Google Books corpus.


Monday December 12, 2016 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Federal B Room Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

2:30pm

Makerspaces, Virtual Reality, The Internet of Things et alia Stories
The maker movement has existed for some years now and almost every makerspace implementation brings its own unique twist to that movement. It is now growing into a larger movement that includes Virtual Reality, The Internet of Things (IoT), robotics, big data, digital scholarship centers, and biology, along with those topics typically associated with makerspaces (digital fabrication, programming, craft, and electronics). These spaces enable the users to express themselves creatively (curriculum-based or not) and to be innovative. Instead of sharing traditional technical details, we are sharing four different stories on how the new makerspaces (or what we may call "Concept or Think Spaces") are making a difference in academic and community settings, and how colleges, universities, and non-profits see the maker culture and makerspaces playing a key role in shaping the new campus strategic directions. Particularly, equity, diversity and inclusivity will be key components in the narratives.
Panel moderated by Karim Boughida.

Speakers
AF

Angelica Ferria

Curator, Makerspace, University of Rhode Island
avatar for Carl Grant

Carl Grant

Associate Dean, Knowledge Services and Chief Technology Officer, University of Oklahoma
Carl Grant is the Associate Dean for Knowledge Services and Chief Technology Officer at the University of Oklahoma Libraries. Carl has an extensive background in the information industry and has worked for many years in the corporate enterprise that supports library services in leadership positions at Ex Libris, VTLS, Ameritech Library Services, and Innovative Interfaces.
avatar for Brian Jepson

Brian Jepson

Acquisitions Editor, O'Reilly Media
Brian Jepson is an Acquisitions Editor for O'Reilly Media who focuses on hardware, the Internet of Things, and Digital Fabrication. He's also the co-organizer of Providence Geeks, a founding member of the National Maker Faire planning and production team, and co-producer of the Rhode Island Mini Maker Faire. He's also been involved in various ways over the years with AS220, a non-profit arts center in Providence, Rhode Island. AS220 gives Rhode... Read More →
BM

Brian Mathews

Associate Dean for Learning & Outreach, Libraries, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
DM

Deborah Mongeau

Professor & Chair, Public Services, Libraries, University of Rhode Island


Monday December 12, 2016 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Presidential Ballroom Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

2:30pm

Open Platform: Two Integrations at the University of Wisconsin-Madison
The University of Wisconsin (UW) adopted the Alma and Primo solutions from Ex Libris in 2014. To meet the needs of its varied and large body of end users, the UW Libraries Digital Strategy team has developed two open extensions to the Alma platform:

1. Open source discovery layer
2. Enhanced Discovery with Open Linked Data

This presentation will discuss and demonstrate both solutions.

http://web.library.wisc.edu/sp/eluna-igelu-showandtell/#/intro 

Speakers
BB

Bruce Barton

Shared Development Group Manager, University of Wisconsin-Madison
OB

Oren Beit-Arie

Chief Strategy Officer, Ex Libris, a ProQuest Company
LK

Lee Konrad

Associate University Librarian for Technology Strategies and Data Services Director, Digital Library and Preservation Services, University of Wisconsin-Madison
SM

Steve Meyer

Digital Architect, University of Wisconsin-Madison


Monday December 12, 2016 2:30pm - 3:30pm
California Room Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

2:30pm

The Library in 2020: Creating Collaborative Digital Library Collections
Today, people expect to get their information online, yet much of modern knowledge still exists only on the printed page, stored in libraries. Libraries have been challenged to meet this digital demand, stymied by costs, e-book restrictions, policy risks, and missing infrastructure. We now have the technology and legal frameworks to transform our library system by 2020. The Internet Archive, working with library, archive and museum partners, proposes bringing modern books online, through purchase or digitization. Our plan includes at-scale circulation of these e-books, enabling libraries owning the physical works to make lendable digital copies available to their patrons. This session will provide an overview of the five-year pilot of this model, conducted with the cooperation of 100+ libraries, making 540,000 modern works available for lending through the Open Library platform. It will include a description of the technology now in the pipeline to bring this effort to scale, as well as an overview of the current efforts to create a collaborative digital collection of modern works.

archive.org
https://openlibrary.org/borrow

Speakers
TB

Tom Blake

Digital Projects Manager, Boston Public Library
avatar for Geoffrey Harder

Geoffrey Harder

Associate University Librarian, University of Alberta Libraries
BK

Brewster Kahle

Founder & Digital Librarian, Internet Archive


Monday December 12, 2016 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Federal A Room Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

2:30pm

Tools for Modern Research Practice
The Scholar's Backpack: Using Virtual Environments to Support Modern Research Practice (Davidson, Grguric)

An increased emphasis on the reproducibility of research has ignited a shift toward more open practices, creating new requirements for researchers to improve research infrastructure and develop a modern research skill set. As a result, reproducible and portable computing environments are critical for future research success. This talk will define a modern research skill set, discuss its relationship to the principles of open science, and introduce the Scholar's Backpack, a project to help researchers create the scientific computing environments they need to be productive. We will show how we are simplifying the learning experience for novice data scientists, how we are improving the reproducibility of scientific computing environments, how these environments have been used in our own Summer of Open Science workshop series, and how they could be applied to library services in a variety of disciplines.


A Comparison of Research Sharing Tools: The Institutional Repository vs. Academic Social Networking Among University of Rhode Island Faculty (Lovett, Rathemacher)

In recent years, academic social networking sites such as ResearchGate and Academia.edu have been gaining popularity as a way for scholars to share their work and make connections. For universities with open access (OA) policies where faculty are expected to deposit their scholarly articles in the institutional repository (IR), this trend presents an interesting problem. On the one hand, growing levels of participation on academic social networks indicate that scholars want to share their work, and that is good news for OA. On the other hand, academic social networks may be competing with IRs and are at odds with the mission of OA policies to provide researchers with a legal, non-commercial, and long-term method of sharing their work. At the University of Rhode Island (URI) we are asking what motivates faculty authors to share their work through ResearchGate-in many cases violating their publishing contracts-versus participating in our permissions-based OA Policy by depositing in the IR. We will present the preliminary results of our study, which includes data comparing the level of participation of over 550 faculty in ResearchGate and the OA Policy. Our data also include responses from a faculty survey that seeks to capture researchers' understanding of the difference between distributing their articles through ResearchGate versus the OA Policy and what motivates their decisions. This study will not only help inform URI's implementation of our OA Policy but will provide broader insight into faculty authors' attitudes towards these two different types of research sharing tools.

Speakers
BD

Bret Davidson

Digital Technologies Development Librarian, North Carolina State University
avatar for Eka Grguric

Eka Grguric

Libraries Fellow, North Carolina State University
NCSU Libraries Fellow | North Carolina State University Libraries
avatar for Andrée Rathemacher

Andrée Rathemacher

Professor, Head of Acquisitions, University of Rhode Island
Andrée Rathemacher is Head of Acquisitions at the University of Rhode Island, where she administers the materials budget and is responsible for the purchase and licensing of library materials in all formats and the management of electronic resources. An advocate of open access and scholarly communication reform, she played an instrumental role in the passage of an open access policy by the University of Rhode Island faculty in 2013. She also... Read More →


Monday December 12, 2016 2:30pm - 3:30pm
South American A Room Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

2:30pm

Update on Funding Opportunities: Programs, Priorities & Trends
In this update, representatives of federal funding agencies and non-profits will discuss the programs, goals and processes they have recently introduced, and they will report on current trends and priorities in the fields they monitor.

Speakers
avatar for Lucy Barber

Lucy Barber

Deputy Executive Director, National Historical Publications & Records Commission
Lucy Barber, Deputy Executive Director, National Historical Publications and Records Commission (lucy.barber@nara.gov; 202-357-5306, http://www.archives.gov/nhprc) At the Commission, which she joined in 2006, Lucy oversees the grant making process in connection with other program officers and staff members. She facilitates applications and grants in the Literacy and Engagement with Historical Records category and is the program officer for the... Read More →
avatar for Nikki Ferraiolo

Nikki Ferraiolo

Program Officer for Scholarly Resources, Council on Library and Information Resources
TO

Trevor Owens

Senior Program Officer, Institute of Museum and Library Services
ET

Elizabeth Tran

Senior Program Officer, National Endowment for the Humanities 
avatar for Joel Wurl

Joel Wurl

Senior Program Officer, Office of Preservation & Access, National Endowment for the Humanities
Always looking to find out what's next. Talk to me about funding opportunities and ideas in the humanities, cultural heritage, digital curation, archives, public/community history sphere.


Monday December 12, 2016 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Statler A&B Room Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

3:30pm

Break
Monday December 12, 2016 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Foyer I Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

4:00pm

Collaborations to Improve Collections Management and Access with CollectionSpace, an Open Sourced Software Solution
The current patchwork of homegrown databases, proprietary systems, spreadsheets, and paper files used to manage object collections at many academic institutions is an inadequate solution to a growing problem. Objects suffer from lack of proper documentation and care, and their use is limited to those who have knowledge of and access to the often non-networked resources describing them. These limitations do a disservice to the faculty and curators who create and maintain these collections, and the students, researchers, and members of the public who would benefit from exposure and access to them. With a single platform, CollectionSpace, an open-source solution for collections information management, allows collections of all sizes and disciplines to benefit from proper management and higher-quality data. The benefits of improved management are myriad; for example, faculty and curators may engage in initiatives that require high quality information, e.g. web-based portals for discovery and sharing, accelerated digitization projects, and object inventories. Webapps and APIs provide a method for integrating object collections information into the broader digital ecosystem of library and archival collections. This session will include project briefings from the University of California, Berkeley, the Harvard University Graduate School of Design and LYRASIS. It will also include discussion of relevant elements of code contribution, governance, and overall end-to-end cost and fiscal sustainability.

http://www.collectionspace.org

Speakers
DG

David Greenbaum

Director, Research IT (RIT), Office of the CIO, University of California, Berkeley
RM

Robert Miller

Chief Executive Officer, LYRASIS
AB

Ann Baird Whiteside

Librarian and Assistant Dean for Information Resources, Frances Loeb Library, Harvard University
Digital Collections and teaching


Monday December 12, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
South American A Room Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

4:00pm

Networked Inquiry as General Education: ThoughtVectors in Concept Space
In the summer of 2014 and again in the fall of 2015, Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) piloted a connectivist massive open online course (MOOC) called "Thought Vectors in Concept Space," a phrase coined by computing pioneer Dr. Douglas Engelbart to describe collaborative inquiry and problem-solving among knowledge workers using interactive, networked computers. The course was a version of UNIV 200, an introduction to research writing required of all students at VCU. Six instructors worked with the Academic Learning Transformation Laboratory (ALT Lab) at VCU to design the course as well as the open cyberspace location where the course would be taught. Course design and pedagogical principles were adapted from several sources, including the Connected Learning Alliance and Research Network as well as from the principal texts for the course: selected writings of Vannevar Bush, J. C. R. Licklider, Doug Engelbart, Ted Nelson, Alan Kay, and Adele Goldberg. Learners, instructors, and open participants from around the world interacted as a networked community to narrate, curate, and share their work on the open web, using principles of experiential learning and high-impact practices. Primary assessment data came from an ethnographic study of the course done as a doctoral dissertation at the University of Minnesota. In addition, the course initiated a special scholarship, the Engelbart Scholar award, that provided two students in the course with a year-long undergraduate research experience culminating with a trip to Silicon Valley to explore the history of computing, tour the Internet Archive, and work on the Engelbart Archives at Stanford University, SRI International, and the Computer History Museum. This briefing analyzes the course, presents assessment data, and suggests opportunities for future iterations within the curriculum as well as professional development for knowledge workers broadly considered.

http://www.thoughtvectors.net
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ITIoXkyzrYg
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=udfq-y4pxmc
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CjBIVqHA7f4
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DZGwRJho2Ts 

Speakers
GC

Gardner Campbell

Special Assistant to the Provost and Associate Professor of English, Virginia Commonwealth University
CE

Christina Engelbart

Executive Director, Doug Engelbart Institute, Doug Engelbart Institute


Monday December 12, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Federal A Room Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

4:00pm

Reference Rot in Scholarly Communication: A Reliable Quantification and a Proposed Solution
As research and research communication nowadays happen on the web, scholarly articles increasingly link to resources that are not necessarily considered part of the scholarly record but are rather so-called web-at-large resources such as project websites, online debates, presentations, blogs, videos, etc. Our research (reported in PLOS ONE [1]) found overwhelming evidence for this trend and showed the severity of link rot for such references. Our more recent study (currently under peer-review) provides unprecedented insight into the vast extent of content drift for these references. We speak of content drift when the content of a referenced resource evolves after the publication of the referencing article, in many cases, beyond recognition. Reference rot, the combination of link rot and content drift, makes it impossible to revisit the context that surrounded these research papers as it was at the time of writing and must therefore be considered a significant detriment to scholarly communication. In order to introduce a level of persistence for the scholarly context we devised the Robust Links approach that consists of archiving referenced web-at-large resources and referencing them using Link Decoration [2]. The proposed approach is aimed at providing optimal guarantees that referenced web-at-large resources can be revisited as they were when a paper referenced them.

In this presentation we will report on both studies, provide a reliable quantification of the reference rot problem and discuss our solution to address it. Robust Links are demonstrated in a recently published paper [3].

[1] http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0115253
[2] http://robustlinks.mementoweb.org/spec/
[3] http://dx.doi.org/10.1045/november2015-vandesompel

http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0167475

Speakers
avatar for Martin Klein

Martin Klein

Scientist, Los Alamos National Laboratory


Monday December 12, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
South American B Room Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

4:00pm

Rendering and Reading: Three University Presses Consider the Future of Scholarly Monographs
In this session, representatives from three university presses will discuss research and development projects underway that will advance the context and utility of scholarly ebooks and address the challenges for exploiting the powerful affordances of long-form digital scholarship, including discoverability and accessibility, the ebook experience for end users, and the socialization of scholarship. Lever Press is a joint initiative between a group of liberal arts colleges aligned with the Oberlin Group, Amherst College Press and Michigan Publishing. It has committed to creating publications that are digitally native, aligned with the mission and ethos of liberal arts colleges, and platinum open access and is now implementing that vision. New York University's Enhanced Networked Monographs project will enable NYU to enrich a corpus of scholarly monographs with semantic tags of critical concepts, names, and geographic locations, resulting in a rich index across the corpus. In addition, NYU will develop a publication interface that exposes the full texts and semantic tags for discovery on the open web. The interface will allow readers to navigate across the semantic topics and to annotate the books, and will enable publishers to enrich the texts with archival material in sustainable ways. MUSE Open is an initiative of Project MUSE, a leading provider of digital humanities and social science content for the scholarly community. Project MUSE currently delivers 652 journals and 44,000 books from 258 not-for-profit publishers. MUSE Open will focus on deploying a scalable solution for the ingestion and conversion of EPUB3 book files to HTML5 + RDFa, defining client-desirable features and functionality for HTML books, and developing a robust cost-recovery model for hosting open access monographs on the MUSE platform. MUSE Open and NYU's Enhanced Network Monographs initiative are funded by generous support from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Speakers
avatar for Terry Ehling

Terry Ehling

Associate Director, Project MUSE/Johns Hopkins University Press
Terry Ehling is the Associate Director of Project MUSE, responsible for content acquisitions and publisher relations. Prior to her appointment at the Johns Hopkins University Press in 2011 she was the Executive Director of Project Euclid, a publishing initiative based at Cornell University Library, and spent nearly 20 years as an acquiring editor and director of the Digital Projects Lab at the MIT Press.
avatar for Monica McCormick

Monica McCormick

Digital Scholarly Publishing Officer, Libraries and Press, New York University
avatar for David Millman

David Millman

Assistant Dean for Digital Library Technology Services, New York University
avatar for Charles Watkinson

Charles Watkinson

Director, Press; Associate University Librarian, University of Michigan
Charles Watkinson is Associate University Librarian for Publishing at University of Michigan Libraries and Director of University of Michigan Press. Prior to moving to Michigan in 2014, Charles was Director of Purdue University Press and Head of Scholarly Publishing Services in Purdue Libraries for five years, and Director of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens for five years. He started in the book business working for Oxbow... Read More →


Monday December 12, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Statler A&B Room Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

4:00pm

Research IT @ Illinois: Establishing Service Responsive to Investigator Needs
Over the past two years an ongoing effort has been underway to further develop the research support IT resources and services necessary to make our faculty more productive and more competitive in the granting process. During this discussion we will first review a year long effort in gathering the needs of researchers and distilling a set of recommendations to address those identified need. This will be followed by a review of elements of a proposal prepared for campus administration articulating a vision and plan to create a dynamic research support environment in which a broad portfolio of resources, services and support are easily discoverable and accessible to the campus research community.

http://researchit.illinois.edu/
http://cyberinfrastructure.illinois.edu/

Speakers
JT

John Towns

Deputy Chief Information Officer for Research IT, University of Illinois


Monday December 12, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Pan American Room Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

4:00pm

The Cost of Open Access to Journals: Pay It Forward Project Findings
To succeed, the "gold" open access (OA) model, paid for with article processing charges (APCs), must be financially viable for academic research institutions and other stakeholders in the scholarly publishing system. The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation-funded "Pay It Forward" project examined the viability of gold OA by looking at institutional costs, faculty and graduate student opinions, and various models for funding APCs. The Pay It Forward research teams gathered a variety of qualitative and quantitative data from publishers, research libraries, and faculty and students including: current APC charges, current subscription charges, journal publication costs, opinions and behavior of graduate students and faculty members regarding publishing, reading, and OA. Previous presentations at CNI described the project plans and provided updates on the work. This session will discuss the final findings of the research and its implications for the viability of the gold OA model.

http://icis.ucdavis.edu/?page_id=286

Speakers
avatar for MacKenzie Smith

MacKenzie Smith

University Librarian, University of California, Davis


Monday December 12, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Presidential Ballroom Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

4:00pm

Transnational Strategies for Stewardship of Our Shared Scholarly Record (and of Each Nation's Published Heritage): Both Open and Subscribed Content
As today's researchers and students benefit from ever-greater ease of access, research libraries seemingly have ceased to be the custodians of content, their supposed e-collections now mere e-connections. Assured and continued access to the scholarly record surely remains an essential task, and if research libraries do not collect and keep each country's published heritage, who else will do so? This session has three perspectives. First, data from the Keepers Registry is used to report how archiving organizations now provide digital shelving for the streams of content issued online. Recent publication of a NASIG 2015 Vision Address by Anne Kenney, 'Building a Social Compact for Preserving E-Journals,' provides background context. A second perspective is required for the challenges, which the Registry helps highlight, most notably the long tail of serial content that must be presumed to be most at risk. This long tail includes works that are 'scholarly,' applied in character (and therefore often in a local language other than English) and a growing body of open access content (both open access journals and Gold/article processing charges articles), as well as other material needed for scholarship but beyond the academy walls. Finally the focus is on the concerted action that is required, nationally and internationally, in order to close the gap between what is being published and what is being archived. Those challenges, noted by Kenney who calls for "e-journal archiving programs [to] form a network of mutual support and interdependence," are the subject of the third perspective in the session. Coincidentally, the Registry's Keepers gathered in Edinburgh (2015) and Paris (2016), issuing an agreed statement on Working Together to Ensure the Future of the Digital Scholarly Record. In this and in the Kenny address there is a direct call to research libraries to act in order to fulfill their various and collective missions. It will be interesting to see how the newly formed International Alliance of Research Library Associations (IARLA) could provide some transnational leadership.

http://thekeepers.blogs.edina.ac.uk/keepers-extra/ensuringthefuture/

http://thekeepers.org
https://thekeepers.org/agencies
http://www.scholarsportal.info/
http://www.copyright.gov/cad/
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0361526X.2016.1141630
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=03H376Npm0w 

Speakers
avatar for Gaëlle Béquet

Gaëlle Béquet

Director, ISSN International Centre
Gaëlle Béquet was appointed director of the ISSN International Centre in March 2014. She began her career as an ICT specialist at the French Ministry of culture and communication. She has also worked in various academic libraries. She holds a PhD in Information Science (2011) from Sorbonne University. In 2014, she published her book Trois bibliothèques européennes face à Google: aux origines de la... Read More →
PB

Peter Burnhill

Director, University of Edinburgh
AD

Alan Darnell

Director, Scholars Portal, University of Toronto
TT

Theron 'Ted' Westervelt

Section Head, Library of Congress
Dr. Westervelt has worked with serials at the Library of Congress since 2001 and currently manages the cataloging and processing of serials acquired via copyright deposit. Since 2009, he has been managing the eDeposit program for Library Services within the Library of Congress. Under this program, the Library is acquiring e-serials for its permanent collection. As a result of his work with eDeposit, Dr Westervelt has been involved more broadly in... Read More →


Monday December 12, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Federal B Room Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

4:00pm

Weaving Together Preservation and Active Research
The Center for Open Science, DuraSpace, Johns Hopkins University, and the University of Notre Dame are partnering to extend preservation capabilities within the Open Science Framework (OSF). Noteworthy growth in the use of the OSF by researchers coupled with the OSF's focus on research workflow integration (e.g., connecting third-party services via API) represents an opportunity to connect two traditionally disjointed activities: preservation and active research. By integrating preservation into research workflows, archiving and preservation would move from being distinct activities following the active research phase to more continuous activities that are part of researchers' existing workflows throughout the research lifecycle. Furthermore, this work will enable the true mission of preservation by facilitating reuse and retrieval of archived data and files into subsequent research projects. This partnership has already resulted in a simple integration of Fedora as a storage provider into OSF and additional capabilities that bolster archiving and preservation such as packaging and ingesting data. Additionally, the partners have initiated discussions regarding a richer integration with Fedora that would take advantage of its native linked data capabilities. Finally, the partners have discussed the possible role for archiving and preservation via OSF as a layer over the evolving National Institutes of Health (NIH) Data Commons. Each of the presenters will describe their respective viewpoint and institutional contributions followed up with a question and answer panel session.

http://cos.io
http://osf.io
http://duraspace.org/
http://fedorarepository.org/
http://dataconservancy.org/
http://curate.nd.edu

Speakers
avatar for Sayeed Choudhury

Sayeed Choudhury

Associate Dean for Research Data Management, Johns Hopkins University
avatar for Rick Johnson

Rick Johnson

Co-Program Director, Digital Initiatives and Scholarship, University of Notre Dame/Association of Research Libraries
avatar for Jeffrey Spies

Jeffrey Spies

Co-Founder, CTO, Center for Open Science
Jeffrey Spies is the co-founder and Chief Technology Officer of the Center for Open Science (COS; http://cos.io), a non-profit technology company missioned to increase openness, integrity, and reproducibility of scientific research. Jeff is also the co-lead of SHARE (http://share-research.org)--an initiative by the Association of Research Libraries, the Association of American Universities, the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities... Read More →
avatar for David Wilcox

David Wilcox

Product Manager, DuraSpace
DuraSpace



Monday December 12, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
California Room Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

5:00pm

Break
Monday December 12, 2016 5:00pm - 5:15pm
Foyer I Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

5:15pm

Current Trends in Digital Newspaper Delivery: Leveraging Shared Resources, Collaborations, and Interoperability in the Libraries Community
At the August 2016 the International Federation of Library Associations News Media satellite meeting, Patrick Fleming, Director of Development at the British Library, acknowledged the increasingly important role that "hyperlocal" newspapers play in local community identity in conjunction with the responsibility of libraries in preserving and providing access to community history as revealed in these papers. As newspaper digitization and born-digital news preservation initiatives grow, libraries are increasingly obligated to both provide access to news content and to digitally preserve it, while improving cost and ease of collection maintenance and sustaining a positive end-user experience for newspaper-based research. Considerations in access and preservation infrastructure, software platforms and feature development, usability, and digital sustainability pose added challenges to the maintenance and delivery of digital newspaper collections. Multi-institutional software development efforts such as the Open Online Newspaper Initiative (Open ONI), collaborative grant-funded initiatives, and adoption of the International Image Interoperability Framework (IIIF) specifications for newspapers have laid the groundwork for libraries to go further together to ensure a manageable level of collection sustainability and improved user experience without accruing the technical debt that often comes with bespoke solutions. This panel will reflect on the latest efforts toward improving the digital delivery of "hyperlocal" news in libraries, followed by open discussion, with a focus on multi-institutional collaborations, leveraging existing platforms and resources, and interoperability via IIIF for digital newspapers.

https://texashistory.unt.edu/explore/collections/TDNP/
https://github.com/open-oni http://iiif.io/
http://iiif.io/community/groups/newspapers/
https://github.com/IIIF/awesome-iiif https://wiki.duraspace.org/display/hydra/Hydra+Newspapers+Interest+Group https://www.loc.gov/ndnp/
http://newspapers.library.wales/

Speakers
avatar for Karen Estlund

Karen Estlund

Associate Dean for Technoogy and Digital Strategie, Penn State University
MP

Mark Phillips

Associate Dean for Digital Libraries, University of North Texas
avatar for Sheila Rabun

Sheila Rabun

Community and Communications Officer, International Image Interoperability Framework (IIIF)
University of Oregon Libraries


Monday December 12, 2016 5:15pm - 6:00pm
Statler A&B Room Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

5:15pm

Enhanced Institutional Repository Indexing, Linking and Display: Facilitating User Access and Publicly Funded Research Compliance
This project briefing describes the progress of an institutional repository (IR) pilot project as it expands into an initiative that promotes innovative, community-wide approaches that facilitate compliance and diverse access to publicly funded research. Phase I of the pilot included a collaboration between the University of Florida (UF) Institutional Repository (IR@UF) and Elsevier that can deliver published versions of UF-authored articles to IR@UF users. Building on this project, UF and the Clearinghouse for Open Research of the United States (CHORUS) have engaged additional universities, research institutions, government labs and publisher members to increase participation in a project that 1) identifies articles authored by faculty, staff, and students; 2) monitors them for public access; and 3) facilitates discovery and access through the IR. Phase I began with comprehensive identification of articles by UF authors using API-delivery of Science Direct metadata; Phase II deploys full-text searching with links to published articles or full text view options for users with diverse access status. Accompanying this IR initiative is exploration of compliance practices and open access publishing by UF authors. The Phase II CHORUS project expands these efforts, engaging a wide range of institutions and publishers, all with the shared delivery of real-time compliance dashboards, enhanced metadata deposition, full text indexing and linking and streaming content within an institution's IR. UF currently acts as an advisor, collaborator, co-designer and usability interface analyst. This project briefing presents preliminary usability results and views of the user experience. Additional researchers on this project include Alicia Wise (Elsevier) and Robert Phillips, Laura Spears, and Chelsea Dinsmore (all of UF).

http://ufdc.ufl.edu/ielsevier
http://www.chorusaccess.org/
http://www.infodocket.com/2016/09/21/chorus-signs-letter-of-agreement-with-u-of-florida-and-scopus-increasing-us-funder-public-access-compliance-pilot/

Speakers
avatar for Todd Digby

Todd Digby

Chair, Library IT, University of Florida
Todd Digby is the Chair of Library Information Technology at the University of Florida. In this position, Todd leads a service oriented department that researches, develops, optimizes and supports advanced library information systems and technology for the University of Florida Libraries. Prior to joining the University of Florida in 2016, Todd held administrative and faculty positions at the Minnesota State Colleges & Universities system, the... Read More →
JR

Judith Russell

Dean of University Libraries, University of Florida


Monday December 12, 2016 5:15pm - 6:00pm
Pan American Room Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

5:15pm

Lots of LOCKSS Keeping Stuff Safe: The Future of the LOCKSS Program
LOCKSS started out with a vision for a collaborative, distributed, research-informed, open-source software-supported approach to the preservation of the electronic scholarly record. While keeping intact these core principles, it has since provided a foundation for a growing number of communities, content types, and use cases. The landscape of technical progress in digital preservation and beyond since its inception, as well as the founders' plan for their own future, have prompted recent and ongoing changes to the LOCKSS Program. As part of its integration into Stanford University Libraries digital services group, the LOCKSS Program is re-positioning itself to lower the barrier to distributed digital preservation still further and facilitate integration with other systems - such as Archive-It, Fedora, and Hydra - both by leveraging components maintained by other communities and by modularizing the LOCKSS software for external re-use. Attend this session to learn more about how the LOCKSS Program and the LOCKSS software are evolving, and what opportunities that may present for new digital preservation collaborations, integrations, and solutions.

https://www.lockss.org/

Speakers
avatar for Nicholas Taylor

Nicholas Taylor

Program Manager for LOCKSS and Web Archiving, Stanford University
Nicholas Taylor is Program Manager for LOCKSS and Web Archiving at Stanford University Libraries. In this role, he manages the provision of distributed digital preservation software and services used by hundreds of institutions across tens of networks, including the Global LOCKSS Network and the CLOCKSS Archive. He also oversees efforts by Stanford University Libraries to establish web archiving as a core collection development activity and... Read More →


Monday December 12, 2016 5:15pm - 6:00pm
South American A Room Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

5:15pm

Scholars@Cornell: Visualizing the Scholarly Record
As stewards of the scholarly record, Cornell University Library is developing a data and visualization service known as Scholars@Cornell with the goal of improving the visibility of Cornell research and enabling discovery of explicit and latent patterns of scholarly collaboration. We provide aggregate views of data where dynamic visualizations become the entry points into a rich graph of knowledge that can be explored interactively to answer questions such as: Who are the experts in what areas? Which departments collaborate with each other? What are patterns of interdisciplinary research? And more. Key components of the system are Symplectic Elements to provide automated citation feeds from external sources such as Web of Science, the Scholars "Feed Machine" that performs automated data curation tasks, and the VIVO semantic linked data store. The new "VIZ-VIVO" component bridges the chasm between the back-end of semantically rich data with a front-end user experience that takes advantage of new developments in the world of dynamic web visualizations. We will demonstrate a set of D3 visualizations that leverage relationships between people (e.g., faculty), their affiliations (e.g., academic departments), and published research outputs (e.g., journal articles by subject area). We will discuss our results with two of the initial pilot partners at Cornell University, the School of Engineering and the Johnson School of Management.

http://demo.scholars.cornell.edu/scholars 

Speakers
avatar for Muhammad Javed

Muhammad Javed

Ontology Engineer, Cornell University
Scholars@Cornell, VIVO, Ontology, Ontology Change Management
SP

Sandy Payette

Director of IT for Research and Scholarship, Cornell University


Monday December 12, 2016 5:15pm - 6:00pm
Presidential Ballroom Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

5:15pm

Supporting Digital Humanities: Report of an ECAR/CNI Working Group
In spring 2016, the Coalition for Networked Information (CNI) was invited to partner with the EDUCAUSE Center for Analysis and Research (ECAR) to develop a report on supporting digital humanities. The resulting paper, currently in draft form, lays out a capacity-building framework for developing institutional digital humanities support, drawing on the experiences of IT and library staff from a broad range of colleges, universities, and national organizations. All major facets of capacity building are discussed, including the cultural shift from a solo-practitioner to a collaborative research model, organizational models, governance, and human and technical infrastructure. The working group co-leaders will provide an update on the report and describe some of the key findings.

http://www.educause.edu/ecar/ecar-working-groups 

Speakers
avatar for Quinn Dombrowski

Quinn Dombrowski

Digital Humanities Coordinator, Research IT, University of California, Berkeley
avatar for Joan K. Lippincott

Joan K. Lippincott

Associate Executive Director, Coalition for Networked Information
Joan K. Lippincott is the Associate Executive Director of the Coalition for Networked Information (CNI), a joint program of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) and EDUCAUSE. At CNI, Joan has provided leadership for programs in teaching and learning, assessment, learning spaces, and collaboration among professional groups. She is a widely published author and frequent conference speaker. She is chair of the Association of... Read More →


Monday December 12, 2016 5:15pm - 6:00pm
Federal A Room Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

5:15pm

The Provenance of Madame Bonnier: Linked Open Data and Intra-Institutional Collaboration
The Getty is comprised of several programs, each of which maintains their own art historical datasets. In an institution wide effort to integrate both systems and content, several projects have started to build and publish linked open data (LOD) versions of those traditional and disparate databases. A clear example is the 17th century painting of Madame Bonnier de la Mosson, which is owned by the Museum, described in art dealer stock books in the Research Institute, and both the painter and the sitter have identities in the Getty Vocabularies, managed by the Trust. This presentation will describe progress made on the technical, social and political challenges uncovered during this ongoing and transformative process. Examples of these challenges include information ownership versus stewardship and the impact that has on URI creation, change management and notification across distributed data, and agreement on modeling of art historical objects and related resources.

Speakers
avatar for Joshua Gomez

Joshua Gomez

Senior Software Engineer, Getty Research Institute
avatar for Rob Sanderson

Rob Sanderson

Semantic Architect, J Paul Getty Trust


Monday December 12, 2016 5:15pm - 6:00pm
South American B Room Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

5:15pm

Yours, Mine, or Ours? The Freedom of Information Act Archive: Making the Transition from Faculty Project to Community Resource
The scenario is familiar: a faculty member launches a digital initiative that immediately draws media attention. It includes rare or unique scholarly content and some innovative tools or interfaces. What model will best support this project for the long term, as it continues to grow? In this session, we will share a project update of the Freedom of Information Archive (FOIA), the world's largest aggregation of declassified U.S. government documents, developed by historian Matt Connelly and his colleagues at Columbia's History Lab. The project is at an important crossroads: What will it take to transition an initiative from a labor of love developed by a small and devoted team, to something embraced by and valuable to a large community? Recent discussions among Association of Research Libraries members have focused on how community goods can be supported, and how to determine when an initiative has become worthy of this support. This session will explore these questions through the lens of the FOIA. Panelists will share perspectives from faculty, libraries, and publishers concerning the values and tradeoffs of the different approaches under consideration.

history-lab.org
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/monkey-cage/wp/2016/11/02/heres-what-data-science-tells-us-about-hillary-clintons-emails/ 

Speakers
RC

Robert Cartolano

VP for Digital Programs and Technology Services, Columbia University
MC

Matthew Connelly

Professor, Department of History, Columbia University
avatar for Nancy Maron

Nancy Maron

President, BlueSky to BluePrint
Nancy works with publishers, librarians and other innovative project leaders to define, test and refine assumptions about new and existing products and services. She honed her skills in over 20 years of experience working at the nexus of publishing, higher education and technology, most recently with the not-for-profit organization Ithaka S+R, where she led the team focused on Sustainability and Scholarly Communications.
BR

Barbara Rockenbach

Associate University Librarian for Collections and Services, Interim, Columbia University


Monday December 12, 2016 5:15pm - 6:00pm
Federal B Room Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

6:00pm

Reception
Monday December 12, 2016 6:00pm - 7:00pm
Congressional/Senate Room Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC
 
Tuesday, December 13
 

7:30am

Breakfast
Tuesday December 13, 2016 7:30am - 8:45am
Congressional/Senate Room Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

8:45am

A Story of Preprints and Curation Networks: Efficiently Scaling Community Outreach Using Public Goods Infrastructure
This panel will highlight the role of public goods in the efficient and scalable development of two community outreach programs with a focus on scholar-librarian collaboration. The first, SocArXiv, is an open repository for preprints in the social sciences that was launched by a group of sociologists and members of the research library community. This group of scholars came together with an interest in engaging the public, sharing research results faster, and challenging the lack of transparency, high cost, and difficulty of accessing journal literature. SocArXiv, along with other communities, is leveraging the open source platforms the Open Science Framework (OSF) and OSF Preprints (a brandable repository and aggregator) to rapidly and efficiently develop and deploy its preprint services while enabling project leaders to focus on issues such as governance, community outreach, and peer review rather than technology. SHARE, another open source service, provides the underlying data and discovery layer of OSF Preprints (and therefore SocArXiv). Similarly, by leveraging public goods infrastructure like SHARE, the Data Curation Network and the SHARE Curation Associates program can focus on engaging the library's expertise to scale curation efforts. Curation is an important role that academic libraries play as we transform our workforce to assume greater digital stewardship responsibilities. Panelists will present sustainable curation models and collaborations that are being developed through institutional partnerships and national initiatives. These networks are creating opportunities to provide training, promote collaboration, and build sustainable curation and research data management services.

https://socopen.org/
https://osf.io/preprints/
https://share.osf.io/
http://www.share-research.org/
https://sites.google.com/site/datacurationnetwork/
www.share-research.org

Speakers
PC

Philip Cohen

Professor of Sociology; Director, SocArXiv, University of Maryland College Park
avatar for Cynthia Hudson-Vitale

Cynthia Hudson-Vitale

Data Services Coordinator; Visiting Program Officer, Washington University in St. Louis; Association of Research Libraries
Cynthia R. Hudson-Vitale is the Data Services Coordinator in Data & GIS Services at Washington University in St. Louis Libraries. In this position, Cynthia leads research data services and curation efforts for the Libraries. Since coming into this role in 2012, she has worked on faculty projects to facilitate data sharing and interoperability while meeting faculty research data needs throughout the research lifecycle. She has also worked across... Read More →
avatar for Jeffrey Spies

Jeffrey Spies

Co-Founder, CTO, Center for Open Science
Jeffrey Spies is the co-founder and Chief Technology Officer of the Center for Open Science (COS; http://cos.io), a non-profit technology company missioned to increase openness, integrity, and reproducibility of scientific research. Jeff is also the co-lead of SHARE (http://share-research.org)--an initiative by the Association of Research Libraries, the Association of American Universities, the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities... Read More →
avatar for Claire Stewart

Claire Stewart

Associate University Librarian for Research & Learning, University of Minnesota
data management, scholarly communication, digital scholarship, research impact, active learning, learning analytics, digital media, academic learning support, space planning, learning spaces


Tuesday December 13, 2016 8:45am - 9:45am
Statler A&B Room Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

8:45am

Deutsche Biographie: From a National Biography to a Historical Information System
The website Deutsche Biographie is a joint project of the Historical Commission at the Bavarian Academy of Sciences and Humanities and the Bavarian State Library. It represents the electronic version of the highly renowned printed encyclopedias Allgemeine Deutsche Biographie (ADB) and Neue Deutsche Biographie (NDB), with 48,000 biographies and more than 250,000 additional person entries. Besides a presentation of the website, we will focus especially on the project's network enabling infrastructure, including such topics as the use of standards for encoding, authority data, linking mechanisms, and technical interfaces for the web application.

https://www.deutsche-biographie.de

Speakers
DS

Dirk Scholz

Bavarian State Library
MS

Maximilian Schrott

Historical Commission at the Bavarian Academy of Sciences and Humanities


Tuesday December 13, 2016 8:45am - 9:45am
Pan American Room Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

8:45am

Developing Technology Fluencies
Weaving Technology into the Fabric of Library Innovation (Lubas, Kome)

Connecting library staff with technology tools and their use is mission-critical in a library's success, and doing so requires as much management skill as it does technology knowledge. Involving individuals in technology planning requires knowing not only the staff member's level of skill but also how much direction and structure they need to succeed. At the Claremont Colleges Library (CCL), our goal in the creation of a technology working group was to create infrastructure to help individuals and teams realize their goals using technology at all comfort levels and skill as well as build and solidify relationships across the library and the colleges. So far, the group has seen successes in fostering innovations that turned into pilot projects for larger initiatives, creating an atmosphere to encourage calculated risk-taking. For example, a group study room technology makeover became a building block for the CCL's new Collaborative Commons. We've also built bridges to IT personnel to help library staff understand scoping and possibilities. Lessons learned include a better understanding of how to match technology skilled staff with service, program, and content experts. We're actively working toward a future of subject matter expertise paired with technology comfort and fluency. Our discussion will cover how we provided and adjusted structure to make staff successful from planning to implementation, and how we have moved pilots to production. Audience members are welcome to bring their own technology skill matching challenges for discussion and suggestions.

Digital Fluencies: New Skills for a Changing Academy (Eke)

With rapid advances in globally networked information technologies, new types of fluencies are emerging, especially in the area of scholarly inquiry. Fluency implies mastery and effortlessness in acting within a community of practice. Literacy is essential and emphasizes individual skill. Both are needed. At The University of Pennsylvania Libraries, we have been developing an openly available curriculum intended to help librarians, academic staff, administrators, faculty, and students engage with new methods and platforms related to new scholarly competencies (and services we offer in the library). Fluencies include information literacy, media literacy, digital pedagogy, digital research methods, digital publishing, and data management and literacy. This session provides an overview of the work done to date and invites further conversation to strengthen a collective understanding of emerging skills in the academy.

http://digital-fluencies.kimeke.org
http://tinyurl.com/digital-fluencies

Speakers
avatar for Kim Eke

Kim Eke

Director of Teaching, Research, and Learning Services, The University of Pennsylvania Libraries
At Penn Libraries, Kim is charged with planning, coordinating, and assessing new services, establishing new programs, and driving cutting-edge initiatives that directly impact the teaching and learning continuum at Penn. She provides oversight for the campus learning management system (Canvas), digital scholarship and instruction services, two technology-rich information commons spaces, media editing and production studios, library teaching... Read More →
SK

Sam Kome

Director of Strategic Initiatives & Information Technology, Library, Claremont Colleges
avatar for Rebecca L. Lubas

Rebecca L. Lubas

Associate Dean, Library, Claremont Colleges


Tuesday December 13, 2016 8:45am - 9:45am
South American A Room Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

8:45am

Digital Humanities Collections and Technologies
Demonstration of a Humanities Data Library (Choudhury, Patton)

The Sheridan Libraries have developed digital humanities projects for two decades beginning with the Roman de la Rose digital library that began in the mid-1990s to the current Archaeology of Reading. Over this time, the Libraries have systematically built infrastructure to browse, use and preserve a range of humanities data. This presentation features a demonstration of the Libraries' evolving efforts to use this infrastructure for locally hosted data that is automatically compliant with the International Image Interoperability Framework (IIIF); IIIF-compliant data from other institutions; and data from other infrastructure nodes that are not IIIF-compliant. This humanities data library provides common access to data with different models allowing the data to be viewed and searched in various ways. Users can browse all data through image viewing and search or use subsets of data based on availability of metadata, transcriptions, etc. The demonstration will include feature data from multiple projects and showcase specific searches that highlight support for multiple data models.


Leveraging Emerging Technologies to Promote Engagement with Traditional Culture: The National Folklore Collection at University College Dublin (Howard, Prado)

During the early years of the Irish republic, the government of Ireland sponsored a range of activities to strengthen national identity through the traditional culture of Ireland-promotion of Irish language, Gaelic sports, and preservation of the folklore and traditional knowledge of the island and its people. The National Folklore Collection (NFC) at University College Dublin (UCD) originated through this latter effort, which was led by from 1935 through 1970 by the Irish Folklore Commission (Coimisiún Béaloideasa Éireann). The Commission collected information in virtually all media formats, spanning all aspects of human endeavor and traditional knowledge, from material culture to oral literature, language and artistic expression. Now one of the world's largest ethnographic archives, the NFC remains the depository of record for Irish folklore and ethnography, and promulgates its role in promoting Irish traditions through the use of digital technologies.

The NFC has begun the ambitious task of digitizing and making available all of the materials gathered by the National Folklore Commission. Through a collaborative activity with Fiontar, an academic unit at Dublin City University (DCU), it has embarked on a decade-long project to promote engagement, nationally and internationally, with the digitized record of Irish traditional culture. The presentation will explore the evolving strategy to engage the public and scholars alike though the dissemination of digital resources in interactive, English/Irish environments. These environments seek to integrate information systems from both UCD and DCU that manage related information, leveraging emerging standards, such as the IIIF and Open Annotations/Web Annotations.

http://romandelarose.org/
bookwheel.org
http://www.ucd.ie/irishfolklore/en/
http://www.duchas.ie/
http://www.ucd.ie/library/

Speakers
avatar for Sayeed Choudhury

Sayeed Choudhury

Associate Dean for Research Data Management, Johns Hopkins University
avatar for John B. Howard

John B. Howard

University Librarian, University College Dublin; Executive Director, Irish Social Science Data Archive, University College Dublin
MP

Mark Patton

Senior Software Developer, Johns Hopkins University
avatar for Sharon S. Prado

Sharon S. Prado

Director of Strategic Academic Initiatives, University College Dublin
Cultural Heritage Collections, digital humanities, teaching and learning, the National Folklore Collection at UCD, resource development, audio-visual collections, music.


Tuesday December 13, 2016 8:45am - 9:45am
Federal B Room Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

8:45am

Expanding Research Data Services
More Than Data Management Plans: Exploring New Outreach Opportunities Through Expanded Research Data Services (Sinclair, Swygart-Hobaugh)

Many research libraries have begun to provide new services to campus researchers around the development of data management plans (DMPs), now required of federal funding agencies. Assisting researchers in this way has provided enterprising librarians new ways of engaging with their university's research community. But assisting with DMPs is just one area where librarians can partner with the campus community in support of research data. Through expanded research data services, the library can work more closely with faculty, graduate students, undergraduates, and staff in handling all aspects of their data, big and small. At Georgia State University (GSU) Library, we have begun to develop a team and services in support of research and data literacy across multiple disciplines involving quantitative, qualitative, business and spatial/GIS data. Librarians are available to collaborate, instruct, and advise across the entire research lifecycle, including identifying, acquiring, and using unique data sets, using data analysis software (SPSS, NVivo, ArcGIS, etc.), assisting with data visualization and survey design, consulting on DMPs, and ensuring for the publication, sharing, and reuse of data. While many of these services have been well established in libraries such as at Duke, New York University, and the University of Michigan for many years, others like GSU may be looking to expand their offerings in this growing and needed area. GSU librarians will share experiences with building their unique program from scratch, including team building, recruitment of graduate assistants, campus marketing and promotion efforts, and plans for assessing and furthering this vital new library role.

Bigger on the Inside: Integrating Research Data Services in Campus-Wide Research Networks (Claibourn)

The diffusion of data- and computationally-intensive approaches to an ever-widening range of disciplines poses opportunities and challenges to universities and the research partners and services within. In response, university libraries have been rapidly building and expanding research data services and expertise to meet growing needs in this domain. An oft-stated goal of such efforts is to become more centrally integrated into larger networks: within the library, within the home institution, and across institutions. Toward this end, the University of Virginia Library's Research Data Services has collaborated in a growing number of formal and informal partnerships and networks to unify expertise and support for such research. Focusing on internal campus relationships, these range from formal networks, like the new Computational and Data Resource Exchange led by the Vice President of Information Technology, to informal partnerships, like our central role in supporting new grant discovery tools initiated by the Office of the Vice President for Research, to invitations to be part of new policy committees like the University's Advanced Computing Steering Committee led by the Director of the Data Science Institute. Through such integration, our still evolving Research Data Services has greatly amplified our reach. This briefing will share our experience building research data services and integrating with campus partners across the institution. We will highlight both some promises and pitfalls we've encountered, and provide some initial metrics and assessment of our efforts to date.

http://research.library.gsu.edu/dataservices
http://data.library.virginia.edu/
http://cadre.virginia.edu/

Speakers
MC

Michele Claibourn

Director, Research Data Services & Social, Natural Engineering Sciences, Library, University of Virginia
BS

Bryan Sinclair

Associate Dean, University Library, Georgia State University
My interests are in collaborative research and discovery spaces, research data services, digital scholarship, and exploring new roles for librarians.
MS

Mandy Swygart-Hobaugh

Interim Team Leader, Research Data Services, University Library, Georgia State University


Tuesday December 13, 2016 8:45am - 9:45am
South American B Room Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

8:45am

Islandora
The Islandora Foundation: Creating and Sustaining an Open Source Community (Ruest, Anez)

Three years have passed since the formation of the Islandora Foundation was announced at Open Repositories 2013. Since that time, the project has welcomed more than two dozen supporting institutions, hosted Islandora Camps all over the world, and completed four fully community-driven software releases with dozens of new modules built and contributed by the Islandora community. The Islandora project has made the journey from a grant-funded project incubated in a university library, to a vibrant and global community facilitated by a non-profit that exists only by symbiosis with the community it serves. This presentation will provide a general overview of that journey, the current status of the Islandora project (including Islandora CLAW) and community. As the Islandora Foundation enters its fourth year, with a staff of two and a truly community-driven development process, membership in the Islandora Foundation provides the shared governance structure that allows for a sustainable open source repository platform for the GLAM (galleries, libraries, archives, and museums) community.

The May Bragdon Diaries Project: Islandora Turned Exhibit (Traub)

The University of Rochester River Campus Libraries assembled a collaborative team of Digital Humanities practitioners, a manuscript librarian, web developers, and graduate students to create the May Bragdon Diaries Project. This project focuses on May Bragdon, sister of famed architect Claude Bragdon, and her diaries; unlike most diaries, May had pasted inclusions (photographs, correspondence, ephemera, etc.) right on top of her manuscript. These diaries feel like a diary-scrapbook mashup, and they required a unique data model and viewer to retain their physical context. Built on Islandora, the team built a platform that immerses the user into the world of May's diaries while empowering the editor and curator to continually enhance and update the TEI (Text Encoding Initiative) that powers the rest of the site.

http://islandora.ca
https://maybragdon.lib.rochester.edu/

Speakers
avatar for Melissa Anez

Melissa Anez

Project and Community Manager, Islandora Foundation
Project and Community Manager | Islandora Foundation
NR

Nick Ruest

Digital Assets Librarian, York University
AT

Adam Traub

Director, Information Discovery Team, University of Rochester


Tuesday December 13, 2016 8:45am - 9:45am
California Room Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

8:45am

The HathiTrust Research Center: It Takes a Village
The HathiTrust Research Center (HTRC) is the research arm of the HathiTrust Digital Library (HTDL). HTRC's mission is to enable text analysis and data mining of massive amounts of digital text from the HathiTrust corpus by developing cutting-edge software tools and cyberinfrastructure to enable advanced computational access to the growing digital record of human knowledge. In this panel discussion, which will be moderated by HTRC Executive Director Mike Furlough, we examine two topics:

1. The HTRC Scholars' Commons program that is focused on developing and sharing a training program for librarians on text analysis and data mining foundation concepts using HTRC tools;

2. The organizational integration steps of the HathiTrust Digital Library to integrate the output of HTDL governance and working groups and committees with the ongoing work of the HTRC and vice versa.

https://www.hathitrust.org/htrc
https://analytics.hathitrust.org
http://hathitrust.org

Speakers
avatar for J. Stephen Downie

J. Stephen Downie

Co-PI HathiTrust Research Center, University of Illinois
MF

Mike Furlough

Executive Director, HathiTrust Digital Library, University of Michigan
avatar for Robert McDonald

Robert McDonald

Associate Dean for Research & Technology Strategies, Indiana University
As the Associate Dean for Research and Technology Strategies, Robert H. McDonald works to provide library information system services and discovery services to the entire IU system and manages projects related to scholarly communications, new model publishing, and technologies that enable the Libraries to support teaching and learning for the IU Bloomington campus. In his role as Deputy Director of the Data to Insight Center, he works on new... Read More →
avatar for Beth Namachchivaya

Beth Namachchivaya

Associate University Librarian for Research, University of Illinois
avatar for Beth Plale

Beth Plale

Co-PI HathiTrust Research Center, Indiana University
Cyclist, data evangelist. Cares about HathiTrust Research Center (HTRC), Sustainable Environments Actionable Data (SEAD), Data To Insight Center at IU.
avatar for John Unsworth

John Unsworth

Dean of Libraries, University Librarian, Professor of English, University of Virginia
Hiring Associate University Librarian for Special Collections now, and five other senior leadership positions in the coming year.



Tuesday December 13, 2016 8:45am - 9:45am
Presidential Ballroom Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

8:45am

What's the Reality of Virtual Reality in a Modern Research University Library?
University of Oklahoma Libraries opened their Innovation @ the Edge in January 2016. The laboratory focuses on visualization technologies, with a strong focus on virtual reality (HTC/VIVE and Oculus Rift) in support of research and pedagogy. The laboratory has been very successful and is helping to connect a growing number of the university community to the library, is generating state and national press and attention to our efforts and catching the eye of donors. In this session we'll share our experiences to date including metrics on usage, what we've learned about incorporating the technology into courses across the campus, lessons learned and how we're adjusting our plans for the future growth of the laboratory as a result.

https://libraries.ou.edu/edge

Speakers
avatar for Matt Cook

Matt Cook

Emerging Technologies Coordinator, University of Oklahoma
After earning his bachelor’s degree in philosophy from the University of Florida in Gainesville, Matt came to the University of Oklahoma where he earned a Master of Arts degree in Philosophy with a focus on cognition. His thesis was entitled: “Extended Perception: The Scope and Limits of Cognition” and was completed in May 2012. His areas of research include spatial cognition, tool use, entrepreneurship, and management. As one... Read More →
avatar for Carl Grant

Carl Grant

Associate Dean, Knowledge Services and Chief Technology Officer, University of Oklahoma
Carl Grant is the Associate Dean for Knowledge Services and Chief Technology Officer at the University of Oklahoma Libraries. Carl has an extensive background in the information industry and has worked for many years in the corporate enterprise that supports library services in leadership positions at Ex Libris, VTLS, Ameritech Library Services, and Innovative Interfaces.


Tuesday December 13, 2016 8:45am - 9:45am
Federal A Room Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

9:45am

Break
Tuesday December 13, 2016 9:45am - 10:00am
Foyer I Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

10:00am

A Serverless and Stateless Gaming Platform: NuPredicts
Northwestern University is in the early stages of exploring migration of its application development to the cloud. This presentation focuses on a recent software application platform development, NUPredicts, and the Northwestern GeoGame, which were developed and deployed from Amazon Web Services cloud platform. NuPredicts is a prediction gaming platform designed to foster student engagement for the One Book One Northwestern 2016 selection, Nate Silver's The Signal and the Noise. NUPredicts has been deployed three times, for a Northwestern Big 10 Football Game, the Nate Silver One Book One Northwestern keynote address, and for the November 8 presidential election. NUPredicts will continue to have various other game instances that will occur throughout the year. A faculty committee guides the NUPredicts content and is composed of six members from the departments of economics, computer science, and the business school. The Northwestern GeoGame is a second game built on the same platform and is designed to spur undergraduate knowledge of geography. This version is a daily geography quiz that is hosted by the university's online newspaper "The Daily Northwestern." Both of these instances reside on the same gaming platform and comprise a responsive-web-design HTML5 game and stateless platform run on AWS in a serverless architecture. The platform leverages AWS API Gateway and Lambda for all the game logic, service composition, and orchestration; the data persistence layer is handled by DynamoDB, a NoSQL database with high availability; and the real-time component, built via the creative use of the AWS Internet-of-Things managed service that broadcasts live updates to all connected users.

https://nupredicts.northwestern.edu

Speakers
avatar for Rodolfo Vieira

Rodolfo Vieira

AWS Solutions Architect & Senior Developer, Northwestern University
HW

Harlan Wallach

Associate Director Academic and Research Technologies, Northwestern University


Tuesday December 13, 2016 10:00am - 10:30am
South American A Room Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

10:00am

Altmetrics Going Mainstream: Moving Recommendations into Practice and Beyond
Earlier this fall, the National Information Standards Organization (NISO) published "Outputs of the NISO Alternative Assessment Project," a recommended practice document on altmetrics, an expansion of tools available for measuring the scholarly impact of research in the knowledge environment. The document represents the discussions and analysis of three working groups: one responsible for compiling definitions for altmetrics and describing use cases covering multiple stakeholder parties; one who assembled registries of alternative outputs and persistent identifiers in scholarly communication, and wrote general recommendations for the application of data metrics; and one who created a "code of conduct" for data providers to ensure data quality in this environment. The overall project, supported by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, began over three years ago while study and development of altmetrics was still in a nascent state; it built on NISO's strength as a consensus-seeking organization to bring multiple perspectives, nuances, and needs into one set of recommendations for the various players in the scholarly community. NISO is anticipating that its Altmetrics Standing Committee will work to promote and support the recommended practice and continue as an active network of stakeholders to determine next steps for agreement and potential standardization in this area of work which is helping not only to transform how scholars in the sciences, social sciences, and humanities are assessed, but to examine and expand value for all kinds of scholarly output.

http://www.niso.org/topics/tl/altmetrics_initiative

Speakers
avatar for Todd Carpenter

Todd Carpenter

Executive Director, National Information Standards Organization
Standards. Standards. Standards. Wine. Standards. Standards. Standards.
avatar for Nettie Lagace

Nettie Lagace

Associate Director for Programs, National Information Standards Organization
Nettie Lagace is the Associate Director for Programs at NISO, where she is responsible for facilitating the work of NISO's topic committees and development groups for standards and best practices, and working with the community to encourage broad adoption of this consensus work. Prior to joining NISO in 2011, Nettie worked at Ex Libris, where she served for 11 years in a number of library and information provider-facing roles, working on link... Read More →


Tuesday December 13, 2016 10:00am - 10:30am
Pan American Room Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

10:00am

Documenting the Now: Supporting Scholarly Use and Preservation of Social Media Content
The dramatic rise in the public's use of social media to document events of historical significance presents archivists and others who build primary source research collections with a unique opportunity to transform appraisal, collecting, preservation and discovery of this new type of research data. The Documenting the Now project aims to address these opportunities by creating a cloud-ready, open-source application, called DocNow, for collecting tweets and their associated web content and metadata, with mechanisms for export and visualization to facilitate use of a large social media data set and the incorporation of these data into local digital preservation systems. This project briefing will cover aspects of technical development as well as ethical, copyright, and access issues surrounding the collection, preservation and dissemination of Twitter data. Documenting the Now is supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation as a collaborative grant to Washington University in St. Louis, the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities at the University of Maryland, College Park, and the University of California, Riverside.

http://www.docnow.io/

Speakers
avatar for Ed Summers

Ed Summers

Technical Lead, Documenting the Now, University of Maryland
I'm interested in the use of the Web as a tool for digital preservation. Come talk to me about web archiving, Wikipedia, Linked Data, and whatever else you are interested in!


Tuesday December 13, 2016 10:00am - 10:30am
Presidential Ballroom Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

10:00am

DRASTIC Measures: Digital Repository at Scale that Invites Computation (To Improve Collections)
DRASTIC (digital repository at scale that invites computation), is an open source digital repository platform for creating horizontally scaling archives that serve the national library, archives, and scientific data management communities. Through the emerging DRASTIC community project we intend to provide a credible solution for Big Data management in large organizations in the cultural heritage, business, and scientific research communities. DRASTIC was developed by Archives Analytics Solutions ltd., in collaboration with the University of Maryland's Digital Curation Innovation Center (DCIC) in the College of Information Studies as the result of a $10.5 M National Science Foundation grant. The software is based on the most widely used distributed database, Apache Cassandra, created to meet the scaling needs of companies like Facebook. DRASTIC supports integration by providing a standard RESTful Cloud Data Management Interface (CDMI), a command-line interface, web interface, and messaging as contents are changed (MQTT). We will introduce the project, show participants how we use it today, and explain our plans to enhance archival data, perform computational analyses, and integrate with other archival platforms.

https://github.com/UMD-DRASTIC

Speakers
GJ

Gregory Jansen

Research Software Architect, College of Information Studies, University of Maryland
avatar for Richard Marciano

Richard Marciano

Professor and Director, Digital Curation Innovation Center, College of Information Studies, University of Maryland
Richard is a professor in the College of Information Studies at the University of Maryland and director of the newly formed Digital Curation Innovation Center (DCIC). Prior to that, he conducted research at the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) at the University of California San Diego for over a decade with an affiliation in the Division of Social Sciences in the Urban Studies and Planning program. His research interests center on... Read More →


Tuesday December 13, 2016 10:00am - 10:30am
Federal B Room Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

10:00am

From Primary Resources to a Foundation for Programming: Disability History at the University of Texas Arlington Libraries
In 2013, the Special Collections Department of the University of Texas at Arlington (UTA) Libraries was asked to collect disability history materials. Review of the current collection revealed many materials relating to disabilities. There is even speculation that one of UTA's maps, the 1493 Secunda etas mundi map, uses disability imagery to depict peoples at the edge of the known world. This was a digital project ripe for exposure and it became the foundation for a program that explored the experience of people with disabilities. From this initial collaboration, two grants were awarded: one from the Texas State Library and Archives Commission to globally expose UTA's disabilities primary resources, and the other a Humanities Collections and Reference Resources (HCRR) planning grant that invited researchers, librarians and archivists to a Disability History/Archives Conference, also the first of its kind. The HCRR grant outcome will be the creation of a portal to connect and reveal digitized primary materials that reside in university libraries, federal repositories, and nonprofits that concern disability history. Strong ties to the Disability Minor at UTA, the first such program in the southern United States (US), provided an opportunity to create a traveling exhibit with a supplementary digital exhibit that showcases UTA's early adoption of adaptive sports, which lead in providing accessibility to students with disabilities on our campus during the 1970's. A continued collaboration involves experiential learning for graduate students who are creating oral histories of prominent Texans with disabilities. See how a simple request to collect primary resources evolved into a program that includes national collaboration and collation of materials that chart disabilities history in the US, one of the largest minorities in the US and worldwide.

http://library.uta.edu/txdisabilityhistory

Speakers
avatar for Ramona Holmes

Ramona Holmes

Department Head Digital Creation, Libraries, University of Texas at Arlington
Dept. Head, Digital Creation | University of Texas @ Arlington
KV

Kelly Visnak

Associate University Librarian for Scholarly Communication, Libraries, University of Texas at Arlington


Tuesday December 13, 2016 10:00am - 10:30am
California Room Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

10:00am

Preserving Federal Electronic Records: Implementing a New Electronic Records Archive at the National Archives and Records Administration
In 2014 the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) began the process of refactoring its Electronic Records Archives (ERA) system. Development of the system had ended in 2010, and it was time to review the processing and preservation needs of an increasingly diverse collection of archival holdings that exceeded 500 TB in size. The initiative is agile and modular, developing an architecture and applications for a cloud-based system to support transfer, ingest, processing, and preservation functions; discovery for staff use; and export to the public National Archives Catalog. The processing and preservation functions will be a highly modular environment where tools can be easily changed and updated as record formats change, and archivists will work in virtualized workbenches. The implementation is bringing tools to the data in the cloud, developing an agnostic framework for incorporating tools, employing both embedded tools and thick-client tools in a virtual environment, presenting a file system view on the S3 storage environment. ERA 2.0 will upgrade digital preservation functionality extant in the current production system, and enable additional efficiency and automation in the processing of electronic records at scale.

Speakers
avatar for Leslie Johnston

Leslie Johnston

Director, Development and Tools Management, National Archives and Records Administration


Tuesday December 13, 2016 10:00am - 10:30am
South American B Room Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

10:00am

The Future of Finding at the University of Oxford
Good resource discovery tools are not simply about making research easier and faster, but about facilitating the creation, preservation and discovery of knowledge by enabling new modes of research, especially across disciplines. In 2014 the University of Oxford began a robust and unique program of activities to improve discovery of and access to its intellectual assets: garden, museum and library collections, open educational resources and research outputs and data. With over 100 libraries, five museums, botanic gardens and an arboretum at the University, Oxford has been working to find world-leading solutions for connecting students and researchers at Oxford (and abroad) with the collections that are available to them. The University also aimed to make its resources more findable by the wider community, to increase engagement with its world-class collections and research. A year-long research study revealed the nuances of why incoming researchers and students struggle to find relevant collections and found that simply providing better search tools across existing metadata will not improve the situation. Therefore, the University has set out to scope entirely new approaches discovery, exploring new tools and approaches to enable students and researchers at Oxford and abroad to understand the scope of collections held by the University and to find them quickly and efficiently. A current project seeks to create an innovative working prototype that balances users' needs for cognitive maps against wide-ranging types, and robustness, of data.

Speakers
CC

Catriona Cannon

Deputy Librarian & Keeper of Collections, University of Oxford
avatar for Christine Madsen

Christine Madsen

Co-Founder & Chief Innovation Officer, Athenaeum21
Dr Christine Madsen works at the intersection of libraries and technology. She is expert in building large-scale systems that use technology to connect researchers, teachers, and students with library and learning resources. She is interested in understanding and building the library of the future–occasionally taking inspiration from the library of the past. Her background is in digitization and digital scholarship, understanding both how to... Read More →


Tuesday December 13, 2016 10:00am - 10:30am
Federal A Room Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

10:00am

Using Big Data, Asking Big Questions: The Chronicling America Historic American Newspapers Data Challenge
"How can you use open data to explore history?" That is the question the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) asked recently in the Chronicling America Historic American Newspapers Data Challenge. The challenge was intended to boost excitement for a historic newspaper data collection and to demonstrate the value of collaboration between libraries, information technology professionals, and researchers. Chronicling America is an open access, searchable database of historic U.S. newspapers, produced by a long-term partnership between the NEH and the Library of Congress. It includes millions of pages of digitized newspapers and descriptive information contributed by states and territories across the country. The Library of Congress provides open access to the data through a well-documented API to enable exploration of the collection in a variety of ways beyond the site's popular web interface. To spur this use of the API and collection, NEH recently hosted a contest to get researchers thinking about creating interesting projects, big or small. The results demonstrate exciting possibilities for both creation of digital collections and reaching out to the research communities that use them. This presentation will describe the data available in Chronicling America and the mechanisms researchers and students can use to access it. The session will then explain the goals of the challenge and provide snapshots of the six winning projects to give a taste of the variety of projects made possible, including important humanities themes and technology including visualizations, maps, tools, and data mashups. We will then discuss broader lessons for establishing connections between content holders and the research and educational community.

Speakers
LW

Leah Weinryb Grohsgal

National Endowment for the Humanities
DT

Deborah Thomas

Library of Congress


Tuesday December 13, 2016 10:00am - 10:30am
Statler A&B Room Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

10:30am

Book Signing & Break
Bring your copies of books by Ben Schneiderman! The University of Maryland Distinguished Professor will be available at the registration table to sign attendees' copies of his publications. On Tuesday afternoon Schneiderman will give the closing plenary address, in which he will discuss his recent book The New ABCs of Research: Achieving Breakthrough Collaborations. 

Speakers
avatar for Ben Shneiderman

Ben Shneiderman

Distinguished University Professor, University of Maryland
Ben Shneiderman is a Distinguished University Professor in the Department of Computer Science, Founding Director (1983-2000) of the Human-Computer Interaction Laboratory, and a Member of the University of Maryland Institute for Advanced Computer Studies (UMIACS). He is a Fellow of the AAAS, ACM, IEEE, and NAI, and a Member of the National Academy of Engineering. His contributions include the direct manipulation concept, clickable highlighted... Read More →


Tuesday December 13, 2016 10:30am - 11:00am
Foyer I Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

11:00am

After the Harvest: Preservation, Access, and Research Services for the 2016 End of Term Web Archive
In the fall of 2016 a group of institutions organized to preserve a snapshot of the federal government web. This is the third time this End of Term (EOT) group has organized with the goals of identifying, harvesting, preserving and providing access to a snapshot of the federal government web presence both as a way of documenting the changes caused by the transition of elected officials in the executive branch of the government and to provide a broad snapshot of the federal domain once every four years that is replicated among a number of organizations for long-term preservation. Presenters from three lead institutions on the project will discuss its methods for identifying and selecting in-scope content (including using registries, indices, and crowdsourcing URL nominations ["seeds"] through a web application called the URL Nomination Tool), new strategies for capturing web content (including crawling, browser rendering, and social media tools), access models including both an online portal as well as research datasets for use in computational analysis, and preservation data replication between partners using new export APIs and experimental tools developed as part of the IMLS-funded WASAPI project. Presenters will also speak to how the project illuminates the challenges and opportunities of large-scale, distributed, multi-institutional, born-digital collecting and preservation efforts, how the project aligns with participant institutions collection mandates, the project's importance for archiving historically-valuable but highly-ephemeral web content without a clear steward, and how the breadth and size of the End of Term Web Archive informs both new methods of collaboration and new models for data-driven access and analysis by researchers.

http://eotarchive.cdlib.org/
http://digital2.library.unt.edu/nomination/eth2016/

Speakers
JB

Jefferson Bailey

Director, Web Archiving Programs, Internet Archive
avatar for Abbie Grotke

Abbie Grotke

Lead Information Technology Specialist, Web Archiving Team, Library of Congress
On the Web archiving team at the Library of Congress, with a focus on project management, policies, and collaborative projects.
MP

Mark Phillips

Associate Dean for Digital Libraries, University of North Texas


Tuesday December 13, 2016 11:00am - 12:00pm
Presidential Ballroom Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

11:00am

arXiv@25: Exploring Future Directions and Strategies
arXiv.org is acknowledged as one of the most successful open-access preprint repositories; it has transformed scholarly communication in multiple fields of physics and plays an increasingly prominent role in mathematics, computer science, quantitative biology, quantitative finance, and statistics. Using the 25th anniversary of arXiv as an important milestone, during the last year, the arXiv team at the Cornell University Library (CUL) has engaged in a series of vision-setting activities to assess the service from various perspectives. The process involved gathering feedback from the arXiv's advisory boards, conducting a user survey to seek opinions, and convening a technical infrastructure (IT) workshop. Inspired and equipped by the input gathered, and with generous grant funding from the Sloan Foundation, the arXiv team is preparing to embark on a three-year initiative to take a fresh view of how the Next Generation arXiv (arXiv-NG) can be re-architected for long-term durability and for improving the overall user experience for the scientific community. The goal of the presentation is to highlight the key findings of the review process, especially the user study, and discuss the implications for the arXiv-NG planning process. The team aims to create a comprehensive plan that factors in a range of issues extending from architectural choices to sustainability requirements, and from policy issues to governance matters. An integral part of this initiative will be networking with other related initiatives and striving to serve the broader scientific community. The ultimate goal is ensuring that arXiv continues to serve its essential role in facilitating science based on the needs of the user community, as well as responding to evolving scholarly communication practices.

http://arxiv.org

Speakers
ML

Martin Lessmeister

arXiv IT Lead, Cornell University
SP

Sandy Payette

Director of IT for Research and Scholarship, Cornell University
avatar for Oya Y. Rieger

Oya Y. Rieger

Associate University Librarian & arXiv Program Director, Cornell University


Tuesday December 13, 2016 11:00am - 12:00pm
South American A Room Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

11:00am

Assessing Institutional Repositories
On Assessing Institutional Repository (IR) Efficacy Over Time: A Case Study in Context (Kaplan, Herold)

Recent calls for a critical re-examination of IR services have sparked conversations focused on the efficacy of IR as support for open access to scholarly publications. In fact IRs are far more diverse than the conversation has thus far reflected, and measures of their effectiveness need to take this into consideration. In particular, IRs that are well-integrated with institutional goals tend to be more successful. In this session, two former IR managers look back on the initial rationale for establishing an IR at the University of Minnesota, and assess how well that has played out over the past 10 years. We suggest that IRs have and will serve increasingly important functions, particularly for public universities with a mandate for transparency and accountability, and that delivering value to the institution is paramount to any definition of success.

Undercounting File Downloads from IRs (Arlitsch)

A primary impact metric for IRs is the number of file downloads, which are commonly measured through third-party web analytics software. Google Analytics, a free service used by most academic libraries, relies on HTML page tagging to log visitor activity on Google's servers. However, web aggregators such as Google Scholar link directly to high value content (usually PDF files), bypassing the HTML page and failing to register these direct access events. Conversely, overwhelming and ever-evolving robot traffic renders log file analytics software very difficult to use and usually results in over counting.

This presentation presents evidence of a study of four institutions demonstrating that nearly 60% of IR human-generated activity is not counted by page tagging web analytics software, and proposes a practical solution for significantly improving the reporting relevancy and accuracy of IR performance metrics using Google Analytics.

http://conservancy.umn.edu
http://scholarworks.montana.edu/xmlui/handle/1/9943 

Speakers
KA

Kenning Arlitsch

Dean, Montana State University
PH

Philip Herold

Research & Learning Director for Agricultural, Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Minnesota
avatar for Elisabeth Kaplan

Elisabeth Kaplan

Associate University Librarian, George Washington University
Elisabeth Kaplan is an Associate University Librarian at George Washington University.


Tuesday December 13, 2016 11:00am - 12:00pm
California Room Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

11:00am

Digitized Manuscripts
Making Use of Digitized Medieval Manuscripts (Albritton, Rabun)

A growing number of manuscripts from institutions around the world are available for use and re-use by scholars through the International Image Interoperability Framework (IIIF). The activities associated with this material, from simple transcription to machine-generation of thousands of annotations, pose a growing challenge for data management and curation. Our presentation will focus on several key areas in this emerging space: a use-case demonstrating the potential for creation and curation of machine-generated scholarly annotations emerging from the Stanford Global Currents project tools for navigation and discovery of massively annotated corpora; and a model for the virtuous cycle that can occur when new information, created by subject specialists, can easily be used to augment existing digital resources within the rich landscape made possible by IIIF.

Digital Tools for Manuscript Study (Bolintineanu, Meikle)

We will report on a two-year joint project between the University of Toronto's Library Information Technology unit and Centre for Medieval Studies. Our project, generously funded by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, aims to build open, modular tool environments to support image-based scholarly research. Our specific use case is the study of medieval manuscripts; our scholarly objective is to answer some important research questions by building interoperable collections of digitized medieval books, witnesses to the Middle English poet Geoffrey Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, and medieval manuscripts collected by the Renaissance antiquary John Stow. In our technical work, we are integrating Omeka, an open-source platform for digital exhibits; Mirador, a IIIF-compliant image viewer developed at Stanford; and VisColl, a tool developed by the University of Pennsylvania's Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies for the visualization of book structure. These tools were selected for their significant traction among digital humanists and manuscript researchers. A major goal of our work is to strengthen modular, standards-based, highly usable scholarly work environments; our specific objective is to situate both Omeka and VisColl alongside Mirador within the IIIF. IIIF is an international specification for consistent digital image delivery and annotation across multiple digital collections, which has been supported by top-ranked research universities such as Stanford and Harvard; major archives including the British and Vatican Libraries; and established non-profits such as the Internet Archive and ArtStor. By making these existing and easy-to-use tools IIIF compliant, we hope to grow IIIF's capacity to share cultural heritage images and expose them to new kinds of inquiry. Our work on this project is guided by our team's broader digital humanities research and development practices. 1) Our work is collaborative: it involves daily interaction and intellectual exchange between a diverse group of scholars, librarians, and developers. 2) Our data is resilient: it must remain open, accessible, easily portable, platform-independent, and based on international standards. 3) We build where we find community: in order to ensure that what we build is robust, sustainable, and above all usable, we build, extend, and integrate open-source tools, in close consultation with those who will use them.

https://globalcurrents.stanford.edu/
http://iiif.io
https://digitaltoolsmss.library.utoronto.ca/   

Speakers
BA

Benjamin Albritton

Stanford University
AB

Alexandra Bolintineanu

Assistant Professor, Digital Medieval Studies, University of Toronto
avatar for Sian Meikle

Sian Meikle

Director, Information Technology, Libraries, University of Toronto
avatar for Sheila Rabun

Sheila Rabun

Community and Communications Officer, International Image Interoperability Framework (IIIF)
University of Oregon Libraries


Tuesday December 13, 2016 11:00am - 12:00pm
Federal B Room Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

11:00am

Exploring Ways to Improve Access to Scholarly Resources: From Anywhere on Any Device
Earlier this year, CNI published a report on the Authentication and Authorization Survey conducted in 2016, describing an environment that remains primarily based on IP-address authentication despite its numerous problems and limitations. Separately, the STM Association has been convening conversations focused on how to improve the user experience and provide a more seamless access experience to patrons, while also providing greater control and analytics over network activity. Community conversations and consensus building are necessary to explore potential alternatives to IP-authentication and to build momentum toward testing alternatives among publisher, system vendors, and library partners. This session will begin with a landscape overview and the results of the CNI survey, as well as a recap of the exploratory work that the STM Association has done. This will be followed by an interactive audience discussion of the opportunity, necessary requirements, pitfalls to avoid, as well as potential next steps.

Speakers
avatar for Todd Carpenter

Todd Carpenter

Executive Director, National Information Standards Organization
Standards. Standards. Standards. Wine. Standards. Standards. Standards.
avatar for Clifford Lynch

Clifford Lynch

Executive Director, Coalition for Networked Information
Clifford Lynch has led the Coalition for Networked Information (CNI) since 1997. Prior to joining CNI, Lynch spent 18 years at the University of California Office of the President, the last 10 as Director of Library Automation. Lynch, who holds a Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of California, Berkeley, is an adjunct professor at Berkeley’s School of Information. He is both a past president and recipient of the Award of Merit... Read More →
avatar for Chris Shillum

Chris Shillum

Vice President, Platform and Data Integration, Elsevier
Chris Shillum is currently Vice President of Platform and Data Integration for Elsevier, where he is focusing on integrating data resources across silos to enable the next generation of personalized services for researchers and building out Elsevier’s big data platform. Previously, he was responsible for the platform and systems which power online products such as ScienceDirect and Scopus. He has worked in various capacities on Elsevier’s... Read More →
RY

Ralph Youngen

Director of Electronic Product Development, American Chemical Society


Tuesday December 13, 2016 11:00am - 12:00pm
Federal A Room Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

11:00am

Institutional Learning Analytics: How Can Academic Libraries Connect?
Throughout academia, institutions are exploring the use of learning analytics in order to improve student outcomes, increase institutional efficiencies, and develop competitive advantage. To this end, institutions have embraced the collection, analysis, and use of data to inform decisions and take actions. They have pursued learning analytics systems and experimented with the descriptive reporting, potential interventions, and predictive results that these systems yield. They've also initiated efforts to leverage interoperability standards to enable disparate learning systems to contribute to central learner records stores that can be queried to investigate connections between learner behaviors and student success outcomes. While academic librarians have initiated library value studies, including correlation research, most have not yet investigated the potential of the learning analytics and interoperability approaches initiated by their overarching institutions. This presentation will provide a brief summary of the general definitions, concepts, and perspectives integral to institutional learning analytics initiatives, as well as a synopsis of current learning analytics efforts at the institutional level, then turn to a discussion of ways in which academic libraries might connect with and contribute to institutional learning analytics efforts.

Speakers
avatar for Malcolm Brown

Malcolm Brown

Director, EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative, EDUCAUSE
Prior to assuming the position of director of the EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative (ELI), Malcolm Brown was the Director of Academic Computing at Dartmouth College. His group supported faculty and students in the use of applications of information technology in research and in the curriculum, and oversaw classroom technology. During his tenure at Dartmouth, he worked actively with the ELI, contributing chapters to the ELI eBooks, helping to plan... Read More →
MO

Megan Oakleaf

Associate Professor, Syracuse University


Tuesday December 13, 2016 11:00am - 12:00pm
South American B Room Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

11:00am

The Digital Preservation Ecosystem: A Community Conversation with Providers of Services
With multiple digital preservation solutions and strategies now available to libraries, research institutions, and cultural heritage institutions, how do members of the community select the right solution or solutions to best secure their content? How do service providers such as APTrust, Chronopolis, the Digital Preservation Network (DPN), DuraSpace, MetaArchive, Stanford Digital Repository, and the Texas Digital Library make clear to the community how the services they offer are unique and how they fit together in collaborative ways? How do large content repositories such as HathiTrust fit into the ecosystem? What kinds of information would the community find helpful as they make important and costly decisions for the preservation of the valuable digital content in libraries and cultural heritage institutions? What distinguishes the community based solutions from the commercial digital preservation solutions offered by vendors? These and other questions will be discussed in this community forum. We are committed to continuing the conversation beyond this session and to putting forth effort toward developing solutions collectively to preserve our cultural and academic digital record.

http://aptrust.org

https://libraries.ucsd.edu/chronopolis/
http://duraspace.org
http://dpn.org
https://www.hathitrust.org/
http://metaarchive.org
http://tdl.org

Speakers
AC

Aaron Choate

Director of Digital Strategies, Texas Digital Library, University of Texas
MF

Mike Furlough

Executive Director, HathiTrust Digital Library, University of Michigan
avatar for Chip German

Chip German

Program Director, Academic Preservation Trust, University of Virginia
APTrust, University of Virginia Library
DH

Debra Hanken Kurtz

Chief Executive Officer, DuraSpace
avatar for Mary Molinaro

Mary Molinaro

Chief Operating Officer, Digital Preservation Network
Digital Preservation Network
SS

Sibyl Schaefer

Program Manager, Chronopolis, University of California San Diego
Sibyl Schaefer is the Chronopolis Program Manager and Digital Preservation Analyst for the University of California, San Diego. She has spent much of her career working with archival systems for arrangement, description, and preservation. She has been recognized as an Emerging Leader by the American Library Association and an Archival Leadership Institute participant.
avatar for Katherine Skinner

Katherine Skinner

Executive Director, MetaArchive Cooperative, Educopia Institute
Katherine is the Executive Director of the Educopia Institute, a not-for-profit educational organization that builds networks and collaborative communities to help cultural, scientific, and scholarly institutions achieve greater impact. Skinner received her Ph.D. from Emory University. She has co-edited three books and has authored and co-authored numerous reports and articles on topics ranging from digital archiving and preservation to scholarly... Read More →


Tuesday December 13, 2016 11:00am - 12:00pm
Statler A&B Room Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

11:00am

Understanding and Improving Media Collection Usage and Discoverability
Studying Researchers: Ethnographic Study of Media Collection Usage at Northwestern & Indiana University (Weinraub, Dunn)

With support from a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the libraries at Northwestern University and Indiana University (IU) have designed, developed and are currently conducting a study of scholarly use of audio and video collections by researchers over multiple disciplines within the humanities at both Northwestern and at IU. Our methodology for the study is seated in ethnographic inquiry and user experience modeling, and we will use these results internally to guide future feature prioritization for the Avalon Media System, an open source system for managing and providing online access to large collections of audio and video. The study is being conducted with three different kinds of data collection: 1) Environmental Observation; 2) Interviews based on observations; and 3) a Diary Study. We will present findings, themes, potential user stories, and a current assessment of our ethnographic study focusing on process, product and participation.

Unlocking Film Libraries Through Discovery and Search (Latsis, Williams)

Dartmouth College's Media Ecology Project and the Visual Learning Group are working to apply tools already being developed for object, action, and speech recognition to a rich collection of educational films held by Dartmouth Library and the Internet Archive. Using existing algorithms that recognize speech, audio, objects, locations, and actions, we will be able to explain what is happening in a collection of one thousand educational films. We will feed the resulting tags, transcripts and other enriched metadata into our Semantic Annotation Tool (SAT), which will generate annotations (built upon W3C open annotation standards) that can be attached to each film. What was once a roll of film, indexed only by its card catalog description, will now be searchable scene-by-scene, adding immense value for library patrons, scholars and the visually impaired.

http://www.avalonmediasystem.org/
http://www.knightfoundation.org/grants/20102605/
http://www.archive.org
https://sites.dartmouth.edu/mediaecology/

Speakers
avatar for Jon W. Dunn

Jon W. Dunn

Assistant Dean for Library Technologies, Indiana University Bloomington
DL

Dimitrios Latsis

CLIR-Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow; Visiting Research Fellow, Internet Archive; University of California, Santa Cruz
avatar for Evviva Weinraub

Evviva Weinraub

Associate University Librarian for Digital Strategies, Northwestern University
MW

Mark Williams

Associate Professor, Film and Media Studies, Dartmouth College


Tuesday December 13, 2016 11:00am - 12:00pm
Pan American Room Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

12:00pm

Lunch
Tuesday December 13, 2016 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Congressional/Senate Room Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

1:00pm

Academic Museums and Libraries: Strong Partners for Stewardship and Engagement
The University of Miami hosted the inaugural "The Academic Art Museum and Library Summit" in January 2016. This event brought together 14 pairs of library and museum directors from a representative cross-section of North American colleges and universities. Working together, these teams spent two days immersed in interactive, participatory programming designed to inspire expansive thinking and facilitate the mining of rich collaborative opportunities among this academic subset of the broader sector of institutions described as Galleries, Libraries, Archives, and Museums (GLAMs). Invitees submitted proposed topics for discussion, as well as at least one idea for a collaborative project on their home campuses, in advance of the Summit. The former helped to shape the convening's three plenary sessions, while the latter ensured that each pair of attendees had engaged in meaningful dialogue regarding the challenges of and possibilities for deep collaboration well in advance of the Summit. This project brief will provide a high-level review of the Summit's findings as documented in a recently published white paper. The latter focused on the potential for developing shared library-museum approaches to collection development, exhibition, curricular engagement, discovery, digitization, and preservation.

http://scholarlyrepository.miami.edu/con_events_aamls2016/

Speakers
JD

Jill Deupi

Beaux Arts Director and Chief Curator, Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami
avatar for Chuck Eckman

Chuck Eckman

Dean of Libraries and University Librarian, University of Miami


Tuesday December 13, 2016 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Federal A Room Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

1:00pm

Assessing Training for Digital Stewardship: Findings from the National Digital Stewardship Residency Program
There is much that digital stewardship practitioners can learn from the formal residency programs aimed at recent graduates of i-schools and related masters programs. Speakers will summarize results from the four assessments conducted on the various National Digital Stewardship Residency (NDSR) programs, and will present a tool for examining competencies in the various components of digital stewardship. Michelle Gallinger interviewed both residents and working professionals who acted as their mentors in both the Boston and New York City programs. Howard Besser examined residents and mentors in the Washington, DC programs, and developed a tool to assess over 100 digital stewardship components (from soft skills like project management to hard skills like familiarity with Bag-It and JHOVE) at both the beginning and end of the residency. Meridith Mink (on behalf of the Council on Library & Information Resources) led a comparative assessment of four NDSR programs designed to identify practices that have contributed to hosts' and residents' success and satisfaction, describing these practices for the benefit of others wishing to plan future programs. Since 2013 the Institute of Museum and Library Services has funded 10 sets of 9-12 month fellowships, embedding early career professionals within organizations trying to manage their digital collections. The goal of NDSR is to train a new generation of digital stewards.

Speakers
HB

Howard Besser

Professor of Cinema Studies and Associate Director of New York University's Moving Image Archiving & Preservation Program(MIAP, NYU
Howard Besser is Professor of Cinema Studies and Associate Director of New York University's Moving Image Archiving & Preservation Program(MIAP), as well as Senior Scientist for Digital Library Initiatives for NYU's Library. In addition to teaching MIAP courses, he teaches regular Cinema Studies courses on New Media, Installation Art, and the Future of Cinema and Free Culture & Open Access. His research projects at NYU have involved preserving... Read More →
MG

Michelle Gallinger

President, Gallinger Consulting
avatar for Meridith Mink

Meridith Mink

Consultant, Council on Library & Information Resources


Tuesday December 13, 2016 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Pan American Room Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

1:00pm

Building Repositories for Social Science and Archaeological Data
Building European Research Infrastructure for Social Sciences: The Consortium of European Social Science Data Archives (Howard)

Established in 2002, the European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures (ESFRI) aims to promote the scientific integration of Europe, and maintains a roadmap of pan-European research infrastructures and supports their development. Research Infrastructures are developed across a number of thematic areas, ranging from preliminary projects to landmark organizations that become formalized as European Research Infrastructure Consortia, or ERICs. Under the heading of Social and Cultural Innovation, the Consortium of European Social Science Data Archives (CESSDA, a candidate ERIC) provides large-scale, integrated and sustainable data services to the social sciences by supporting high-quality, national and international research and cooperation. Through shared infrastructure and increased harmonization of practices among CESSDA service providers, tangible benefits will be realized that advance research nationally as well as across European boundaries. The presentation will review the context, objectives, and work plan of CESSDA, identifying opportunities and challenges for social science data producers, service providers, and researchers, referencing the Irish Social Science Data Archive as a case study of a national service provider.

tDAR: A Domain Repository for Academics, Business, Government, and Scholars (McManamon)

The Digital Archaeological Record (tDAR) is a unique repository for data sets, documents, images, geospatial data, scanned data, and other kinds of digital information related to archaeology and cultural heritage research and resources. The repository was developed and is maintained by the Center for Digital Antiquity (DA) at Arizona State University (ASU). DA works collaboratively with the ASU Library and its informatics and repository services. The repository provides a solution to the challenge of preserving digital archaeological data in all its many forms for research projects funded with the requirement for generated data to be placed in an accessible repository. Data in tDAR are international, spanning the archaeological and historical records of all continents. The content grows daily; at present it includes over 370,000 records of archaeological reports and other documents (10,000 of these include a digital full-text file), 20,000 images, 1,200 data sets, and other digital data files. The repository is used by researchers from a range of universities, in addition to ASU. Private sector consulting firms and public agencies in need of a digital repository where their data can be managed also use tDAR. The data management approach utilized in tDAR places citation of archaeological data on a new level using persistent identifiers, enhancing the potential impact of academic research findings. Another novel aspect of the tDAR repository is an analytical "tool kit" that provides the means to integrate different data sets for secondary descriptive and analytical use of data. Data, images, and specialized documents that supplement or support articles and books published in traditional scholarly outlets can be placed in tDAR and made available for subsequent uses, including independent test and validation of research results. Grey literature and data not destined to appear in traditional scholarly journals or publications have a home in tDAR where they can be discovered, accessed, preserved, and used. Initial support by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation was essential for the creation of DA and the development of tDAR for public use.

http://cessda.net/
http://www.issda.ie/
https://core.tdar.org/
http://www.digitalantiquity.org/

Speakers
avatar for John B. Howard

John B. Howard

University Librarian, University College Dublin; Executive Director, Irish Social Science Data Archive, University College Dublin
FP

Francis P. McManamon

Executive Director, Center for Digital Antiquity, Arizona State University


Tuesday December 13, 2016 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Statler A&B Room Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

1:00pm

Building the Better Ebook and Beyond
Monographs are increasingly making the print-to-digital shift that journals started twenty years ago, yet many of the popular platform options for accessing scholarly books simply mirror the existing discovery structure for journals: books are presented as a sequential list of "journal article"-sized chapter files for downloading, a practice that "journal"-izes the book and arguably fails to take full advantage of the rich long-form argument that unfolds across chapters. In some cases monographs are also starting to morph into long form works of digital scholarship that could never be represented on the printed page; a phenomenon that not only presents technology challenges but also impacts publisher processes and workflows.

This session brings together several initiatives that are exploring the evolution of the monograph: (1) JSTOR Labs, an experimental platform development group, convened at Columbia University by a group of scholars, librarians, and publishers in October 2016. Together, they tackled this design question: if we applied data visualization and design thinking techniques to the existing corpus of digitized monograph files, how could we improve the discovery and user experience for scholars, students, and general readers? The first presentation will discuss the design principles and challenges that the expert group identified, demonstrate the working prototype created during a "flash build" at Columbia in November by JSTOR Labs, and explain how CNI attendees and others can take advantage of this openly available development. The lean, user-oriented product design process used for this project will also be outlined; a design process that any library or publisher can take advantage of for their own technology and innovation projects. (2) Emory University and the University of Michigan are working together on interrelated projects supported by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation that explore how publishers can best support and sustain digital scholarship. Emory is leading a project to create a "Model Contract for Digital Scholarship" that can be used to set out roles and responsibilities around the selection, production, marketing, and preservation of a publication that takes full advantage of digital affordances, including open access. Michigan is developing a publishing platform optimized for digital scholarship, Fulcrum, built on the Hydra/Fedora framework. To ground the conversation, a concrete example of one new work of digital scholarship published by University of Michigan Press will be presented ("A Mid-Republican House from Gabii"). This is a multimodal work that cannot be presented in print and involves integrated narrative, datasets, and 3D models.

http://labs.jstor.org/monograph/
http://labs.jstor.org
http://web.library.emory.edu/news-events/news/archives/2016/mellon-grant-emory-model-publishing.html
http://fulcrum.org/
http://www.publishing.umich.edu/projects/mapping-the-free-ebook/

Speakers
AH

Alex Humphreys

Director, JSTOR Labs, JSTOR
avatar for Lisa Macklin

Lisa Macklin

Director, Scholarly Communications Office, Emory University
Lisa A. Macklin is the director of the Scholarly Communications Office for Emory University Libraries. As both a librarian and a lawyer, Lisa focuses on copyright, licensing, and scholarly communication issues, working with faculty and students on the application of copyright law to teaching, research, and scholarship. Her interests include transformations in scholarship and publishing, including new models of scholarship in digital form and... Read More →
BR

Barbara Rockenbach

Associate University Librarian for Collections and Services, Interim, Columbia University
avatar for Charles Watkinson

Charles Watkinson

Director, Press; Associate University Librarian, University of Michigan
Charles Watkinson is Associate University Librarian for Publishing at University of Michigan Libraries and Director of University of Michigan Press. Prior to moving to Michigan in 2014, Charles was Director of Purdue University Press and Head of Scholarly Publishing Services in Purdue Libraries for five years, and Director of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens for five years. He started in the book business working for Oxbow... Read More →


Tuesday December 13, 2016 1:00pm - 2:00pm
South American B Room Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

1:00pm

Migrating Library Collections and Operations to Linked Data: Assessment, Planning and Experimentation
This session introduces approaches for converting legacy library cataloging and metadata (for both general and digital special collections) and transforming traditional workflows and data flows in order to support linked data. Presenters share insights about challenges and solutions learned from analyzing a large-scale general collection and two small-scale special collection scenarios.

In mid December 2016 the ILS Supported BIBFLOW project will release its roadmap for conversion of library operations to a linked data ecosystem. The roadmap will provide: 1) a comprehensive assessment of the current transitional readiness of libraries and supporting vendor organization; 2) an assessment of the impact on and potential workflow and operational benefits of conversion; and 3) a detailed plan for phased conversion to native linked data operations-taking into account the complex data flows that drive library operations. The proposed presentation will introduce the roadmap, providing a high altitude view of the overall recommendations and drilling down on key nodes in the recommended conversion process.

Digitized special collections can support complex connective research and new ways of contextualizing physically dispersed primary sources. But simply making single-institution special collection content Web-accessible in isolation rarely achieves desired ends. With support from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, Exploring the Benefits of LOD for Special Collections is examining the challenges and rewards of using linked data to enhance discoverability and connectedness of three Illinois digitized special collections. Another Illinois project, Emblematica Online is looking at similar issues for a multi-institutional virtual collection of Early Modern emblem books. Presenters will describe experiences transforming legacy, non-MARC metadata into Linked Open Data (LOD); integrating LOD-compatible controlled vocabularies and services into portal design, back-end workflows and front-end user interfaces. Results to date show promise and suggest that key is a commitment to collaborate with domain scholars and to engage scholars in ongoing, active curation (e.g., through annotation).

http://publish.illinois.edu/linkedspcollections/
http://imagesearch-test1.library.illinois.edu/cdm/landingpage/collection/test-motley http://emblematica.library.illinois.edu/
https://www.library.ucdavis.edu/bibflow/

Speakers
TW

Timothy W. Cole

Professor, Mathematics Librarian and CIRSS Coordinator for Library Applications, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
MK

Myung-Ja K. Han

Associate Professor and Metadata Librarian, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
avatar for MacKenzie Smith

MacKenzie Smith

University Librarian, University of California, Davis
avatar for Carl G. Stahmer

Carl G. Stahmer

Director of Digital Scholarship, University of California, Davis
Carl G. Stahmer, PhD is the Director of Data and Digital Scholarship at the University Library, University of California, Davis, in which capacity he oversees a variety of digital initiatives on campus. He also serves as Associate Director for Humanities at the UC Davis Data Science Initiative, Associate Director for Technology at the Advanced Research Consortium, Institute for Digital Humanities Media and Culuture, Technical Director of the... Read More →


Tuesday December 13, 2016 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Presidential Ballroom Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

1:00pm

Modern Digital Preservation Approaches from the Fedora Community
Digital preservation is complex, and the vocabulary is not well-defined; many people use the same terms with different meanings. A long-term digital preservation strategy incorporates many components, including repositories with digital preservation features, geographically and functionally diverse storage systems, organisational, financial, and legal succession plans, and compliance with best-practice recommendations. Moreover, there are levels of preservation to match the risk tolerance and available resources of an institution - very few institutions have the workflows needed to produce, manage, and preserve digital objects, so there is no "one size fits all" approach. Fedora is a durable digital object repository that is part of a long-term digital preservation solution. It is a community-based solution that leverages existing, widely used standards whenever possible to ensure long-term sustainability. Fedora stakeholders from around the world have come together to clearly define how Fedora supports digital preservation, and how it fits into a larger digital preservation solution. Representatives from DuraSpace, Stanford University, the University of California, San Diego, and the University of Virginia will participate in a panel discussion on using Fedora as a key part of their long-term digital preservation strategy.

http://fedorarepository.org

Speakers
avatar for Tom Cramer

Tom Cramer

Assistant University Librarian & Director for Digital Library Systems & Services, Stanford University
Hydra, Hydra-in-a-Box, Blacklight, Fedora, IIIF, Web Archiving, Linked Data, geospatial services, open source, community.
avatar for Declan Fleming

Declan Fleming

Chief Technology Strategist and Director of Information Technology Services, University of California, San Diego
avatar for Robin Ruggaber

Robin Ruggaber

Senior Director, Library Experience & Library Chief Technical Officer, University of Virginia
I am drawn to the complex challenges facing our community and the opportunity to protect open availability and access to intellectual and cultural knowledge. Talk to me about community driven open source, strategic, operational or architectural aspects of technology at UVa, our future direction with customer facing services- the physical and the virtual from the prospective of the user.
avatar for Evviva Weinraub

Evviva Weinraub

Associate University Librarian for Digital Strategies, Northwestern University
avatar for David Wilcox

David Wilcox

Product Manager, DuraSpace
DuraSpace


Tuesday December 13, 2016 1:00pm - 2:00pm
South American A Room Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

1:00pm

Spaces for Learning and Scholarship
Reflections on a Digital Scholarship Center, Year Three (Wang, Bergstrom)

In Spring 2014, representatives from The University of Notre Dame's Center for Digital Scholarship spoke at CNI about starting a digital scholarship center, and particularly about the challenges of establishing sustainable services within this context. Since then Notre Dame's Center for Digital Scholarship has been funded to construct new, enhanced spaces within the main campus library. While the Center has explored sustainable solutions to providing core services since its inception, particularly that allow for reduction of librarian time on routine work, this move necessitates a reexamination of our service portfolio. To this end, the Center launched online video modules on the edX platform introducing students to GIS in 2016 and are working with the campus Office of Digital Learning to create additional online learning courses devoted to the Center's most-requested workshops, with the goal of making this content available to university audiences and the public. This session is intended to facilitate a conversation about the evolution of a Center's services and spaces, coupled with examples of digital scholarship projects that Notre Dame's Center has facilitated, and provide takeaways that address the development of emerging services in conjunction with traditional library services.

Evolving Connections: Community-Driven Learning Ecosystems in the Library (Alexander, Sitar)

Our student community is a significant driver in how we reimagine our services, programs, and spaces. Realizing that students are seeking value-added residential learning experiences, enabled by proximity to expertise, unique resources, advanced learning facilities, and unparalleled opportunity, we have reimagined and redefined a vision for connected scholarship. We will discuss the evolution of traditional technology training programs into a connected learning ecosystem designed around the intersections of technology, learning and pedagogy and will detail how a newly conceived program called Connected Scholarship (e.g. ScholarSpace, Design Labs, mixed methods research) is committed to creating pathways for a diverse campus community to pursue shared questions that can enable new contexts for scholarship and academic transformation. We will share early results from re-orienting our services and learning spaces to be focused on impacting student critical thinking, intellectual openness, collaboration, risk-taking, and agility combined with real contexts and authentic settings.

https://www.cni.org/topics/digital-humanities/supporting-and-encouraging-digital-scholarship
https://edge.edx.org/courses/course-v1:NotreDame+GIS000+0000/about

Speakers
LA

Laurie Alexander

Associate University Librarian for Learning and Teaching, University of Michigan
avatar for Tracy Bergstrom

Tracy Bergstrom

Program Co-Director, Digital Initiatives and Scholarship, University of Notre Dame
Tracy Bergstrom is the director of the Specialized Collection Services Program within the Hesburgh Libraries of Notre Dame. As such, she oversees Rare Books and Special Collections, University Archives, Preservation, and Digital Production. She is also the curator of the Zahm Dante and early Italian imprints collection at Notre Dame and is especially interested in the print history of Dante’s Divine Comedy.
avatar for Meghan Sitar

Meghan Sitar

Director of Connected Scholarship, University of Michigan
avatar for Zheng (John) Wang

Zheng (John) Wang

Associate University Librarian, Digital Access, Resources and Information Technology, University of Notre Dame
John oversees three programs, Information Technology and Discovery Services, Resource Acquisitions and Delivery Services, and Digital Initiatives and Scholarship: | *Provide Leadership and Vision by playing a leading role in library-wide strategic planning, resource management, and assessment and helping to develop and convey a clear and compelling vision; | *Closely align goals, structure, resources and values with those of the University... Read More →


Tuesday December 13, 2016 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Federal B Room Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

2:00pm

Break
Tuesday December 13, 2016 2:00pm - 2:15pm
Foyer I Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC

2:15pm

Closing Plenary (Shneiderman) + Special Briefing (Kahn)
CNI is pleased to welcome:

Robert Kahn, president of the Corporation for National Research Initiatives (CNRI), whose special 30-minute briefing will be followed by the keynote address:

Closing Plenary Speaker
Ben Shneiderman
Distinguished University Professor
University of Maryland

A Special 30-Minute Briefing by Robert E. Kahn, President & CEO, Corporation for National Research Initiatives

The Computer Science Technical Reports Project and the Digital Object Architecture
The Digital Object Architecture originated from work done at the Corporation for National Research Initiatives (CNRI) on mobile programs in the 1980s, and represents the architecture without mobility. In addition, some of the security notions inherent in the architecture trace their origins to the work on wireless networking (this was a Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency [DARPA] project known as packet radio in the 1970s). Another DARPA supported effort to digitize, archive and make accessible computer science technical reports (CSTR) from several leading universities in the early 1990s resulted in the formulation of the Digital Object Architecture and the implementation of its components. This project, known by its acronym CSTR, pioneered the work in digital libraries in the United States. In the talk, the work in the CSTR will be reviewed briefly along with the progress achieved in evolving and implementing the Digital Object Architecture.

Robert E. Kahn is Chairman, CEO and President of CNRI, which he founded in 1986 after a 13 year term at the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). CNRI was created as a not-for-profit organization to provide leadership and funding for research and development of the National Information Infrastructure. Dr. Kahn is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the National Academy of Sciences, and he is a member of the State Department’s Advisory Committee on International Communications and Information Policy.

http://www.cnri.reston.va.us/

Plenary Address:
Ben Shneiderman, Distinguished University Professor, Department of Computer Science,University of Maryland

The New ABCs of Research: Achieving Breakthrough Collaborations


Solving the immense problems of the 21st century will require ambitious research teams that are skilled at producing practical solutions and foundational theories simultaneously – that is the ABC Principle: Applied & Basic Combined. Then these research teams can deliver high-impact outcomes by applying the SED Principle: Blend Science, Engineering and Design Thinking, which encourages use of the methods from all three disciplines. These guiding principles (ABC & SED) are meant to replace Vannevar Bush’s flawed linear model from 1945 that has misled researchers for 70+ years. These new guiding principles will enable students, researchers, academic leaders, and government policy makers to accelerate discovery and innovation.

Ben Shneiderman is a Distinguished University Professor in the Department of Computer Science, Founding Director (1983-2000) of the Human-Computer Interaction Laboratory, and a Member of the University of Maryland Institute for Advanced Computer Studies (UMIACS). He is a Fellow of the AAAS, ACM, IEEE, and NAI, and a Member of the National Academy of Engineering. His contributions include the direct manipulation concept, clickable highlighted web-links, touchscreen keyboards, dynamic query sliders for Spotfire, development of treemaps, novel network visualizations for NodeXL, and temporal event sequence analysis for electronic health records.

http://www.cs.umd.edu/hcil/newabcs
http://www.cs.umd.edu/~ben
http://www.cs.umd.edu/hcil/

Speakers
avatar for Robert E. Kahn

Robert E. Kahn

President & CEO, Corporation for National Research Initiatives
Robert E. Kahn is Chairman, CEO and President of CNRI, which he founded in 1986 after a 13 year term at the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). CNRI was created as a not-for-profit organization to provide leadership and funding for research and development of the National Information Infrastructure. Dr. Kahn is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the National Academy of Sciences, and he is a member of the State... Read More →
avatar for Ben Shneiderman

Ben Shneiderman

Distinguished University Professor, University of Maryland
Ben Shneiderman is a Distinguished University Professor in the Department of Computer Science, Founding Director (1983-2000) of the Human-Computer Interaction Laboratory, and a Member of the University of Maryland Institute for Advanced Computer Studies (UMIACS). He is a Fellow of the AAAS, ACM, IEEE, and NAI, and a Member of the National Academy of Engineering. His contributions include the direct manipulation concept, clickable highlighted... Read More →


Tuesday December 13, 2016 2:15pm - 3:45pm
Presidential Ballroom Capital Hilton Hotel, 1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC